The biopsy

21063833It is time to continue documenting the diagnosis phase of my cancer. Yesterday I published a post about the CT scan and some new symptoms I was experiencing. Todays post will focus upon the biopsy. It seems almost odd getting to this point of the diagnostic blog posts, because that means I am very close to getting caught up to real-time and being able to share my first chemo experience. But I plan to stay focused for now and will continue on with the diagnostic phase.

In the last post I left off with my general physician revealing the results of my CT scan. Basically I had “several” swollen lymph nodes and other organs with possible issues. My GP had already spoken with a radiology doctor about my case. It was Tuesday, August 21, when my GP let me know the radiologist would likely set me up with a biopsy for that Thursday. Sure enough I got a call from the hospital scheduling the next morning for a biopsy on Thursday morning. It seemed to me as if things were suddenly going fast.

There was some miscommunication going into my procedure on Thursday. My biopsy was not scheduled until later in the day, so I thought it would be OK to eat breakfast. Nobody told me I couldn’t, and since this biopsy was being done on a large lump sticking out of my neck I didn’t think it would be a big deal. I was wrong. I now know going forward that I should clarify such things. Since I had breakfast the radiologist decided I would not get a general anesthesia and instead would only get a local numbing agent of some type. That ended up being sufficient and was no big deal. But it could have been a big deal and worth remembering.

Just before surgery I met the radiology doctor who would be performing the biopsy. This was another surprise to me. I had no idea radiology doctors actually performed surgeries. This doctor was not just a radiology specialist, but also a Interventional Radiology specialists. I had assumed it would be a surgeon doing the procedure with the help of a radiologist.

The radiology doctor let me know I would be having a needle biopsy of the lump on the left side of my neck. Basically this meant he would use a needle to remove several samples from the lump. I was scheduled to have the surgery done in the CT Scan room as it would have to be done by imaging since the neck was such a precarious place to poke around in. Here again I was surprised. I figured that since I had a large lump sticking out of my neck that he would just stick a needle in and take some samples. Nope, apparently the neck has a lot of nerves, vessels, and other stuff going through it and even a lump sticking out could be hard to safely reach. He also let me know there would be an ultrasound machine there. They would try using that before the CT scan to perform the procedure.

I was then wheeled to the CT Scan room. The room was not yet ready for me. For the next half hour or so I sat there on the table as the doctor and other people involved in the procedure set everything up. The ultrasound tech setup her gear and immediately started to take pictures. I was able to see first-hand just how much of mess it would be to get to the lump. Between the radiology doctor and tech they did find a good route to the lump from a couple of inches away toward the back of my neck. Again that surprised me, they would actually have to go partway through my neck to reach a lump sticking way out of my neck. The radiology doctor also noted he was getting good enough imaging from the ultrasound machine, making the CT scan unnecessary.

At some point the doctor had numbed my neck. I don’t really remember that part, but I know it must have happened. I think my not noticing had something to do with the cool, calm, and collected demeanor of the doctor. He seemed like the type that would remain level-headed no matter what was going on around him. I really appreciated that about him.

At the start of the procedure I was told to look right and keep my head still until told otherwise. The doctor was at my left ready with the needle. On my right side, where I was looking, was the ultrasound machine. I was able to watch the doctor actually navigate the needle into my lump by watching the ultrasound screen. I found that quite interesting and helped to pass the time.

I’m not sure how long it actually took to get all the samples. If I remember correctly nine total samples were taken. Each time the doctor took a sample there was a loud click. I’m not sure if I felt the samples being cut or not. Each time I heard I click I thought I felt a small tinge of pain in my neck; but it could also have been the loud click making me think I felt something. I think there was about a minute or two between each click.

At the end of the procedure I remember the doctor holding a bandage down on the site he removed the needle from. I then laid there on the table for a long time as the medical staff went around doing whatever they were doing. I was supposed to keep my head straight for a long time, I think about an hour or so.

At the end of the hour I was back in the recovery room. I showed I could eat and go to the bathroom right away. It wasn’t very long at all after that when I was discharged. The doctor let me know it would take three to five days to get the biopsy results. Since this was a Thursday, that meant it would likely be the next week before I actually received a call with the results.

I’ll end this part of my diagnosis post here. In this post I shared my biopsy experience. Going into the next post I will share my experience getting the results of the biopsy. I just occurred to me that the biopsy procedure was the last time I had a scan or test done with some small hope that I didn’t have cancer.

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