Working while on chemo

Desktop of the businessman.One of the most common questions I get from people is whether I am able to work while going through chemo. I do work, but it is greatly diminished from what I was once capable of. In this post I will briefly blog about my current work experience while going through chemo.

The type of chemo I am going through is called R CHOP. It is a very aggressive type of chemo and is very hard on the body (but then I have yet to hear of a non-aggressive type of chemo). I have chemo once every three weeks. On the day of chemo and the two days following I am basically unable to work at all. Fatigue hits heavy on these days and I sleep most of my day away. Actually I look forward to these days now, because I know for at least a few days I won’t suffer from insomnia. At the same time though it means on these days I cannot work.

Earlier this year I had already started to work from home most days. This was not done because of my cancer. Instead I started to work from home three to four days a week in order to take care of my youngest son. By summer I was rarely able to make it to the office even once a week due to breathing problems. When I started chemo it was time to face the fact I should not be in the office at all. There are too many customers who come into the office sick. With my weakened immune system it just doesn’t seem worth the risk to come into the office when I have the option to work from home. The biggest downside to working completely from home is that it feels like I’ve abandoned my wife to run the office by herself. Actually, cleaning out my office was one of the hardest things I’ve done since being diagnosed with cancer.

Working from home may allow me to keep away from germs. But it doesn’t mean I get a lot done on the typical day. The brain fog I suffer from seems to get worse every day. On some days I can only work a few hours before the brain fog gets so bad that I can’t even put two thoughts together, much less work. On other days I can put in a good six or even eight hours of work. There is no consistency about how much time I am able to work. I have found that if I spend an hour playing word or logic games before I work, that I am able to use my mind for work longer. Also the days I am able to work longer I am doing tasks such as archiving old files in our database. This is a long monotonous process which requires very little brain power. Even if it is monotonous it does at least give me something I can do when the brain fog sets in.

I am somewhat lucky that I am able to work from home. Many cancer patients don’t have this option. Hopefully by the time busy season begins for the office I will be done with chemo and my brain fog will lift a bit. No matter what though I am more than happy to do whatever work I can from home. It is much better than just sitting around thinking about cancer.

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