The week and a half following the maintenance infusion

It has been just a little over a week and a half since I had my maintenance infusion of Rituximab. Overall I would say maintenance has gone well for me. But I have experienced some side-effects. In this post, I will share how the last week and a half has gone for me.

Lack of sleep is back in full force!

In the post about my maintenance treatment, I mentioned taking a four-hour nap afterward. Unfortunately, that seems to be about the longest I’ve slept over the last couple of weeks. That night I slept for only a couple of hours. At the time I hoped my lack of sleep was due to having taken such a long nap. I also believed the steroids given to me during the maintenance infusion might have caused the sleeplessness. Both of those reasons could have been true for that night, but wouldn’t explain my sleeplessness since.

Since maintenance I seem to get about three to four hours of sleep a night. Every four or five days I seem to sleep about six or seven hours, most likely my body trying to catch up on sleep. I did have sleep issues prior to maintenance, but at that time I was back up to five or six hours of sleep every night. It is possible my sleep apnea is getting worse. This week I actually go back for a second sleep study to get a CPAP machine set up in order to help me sleep. I’m not really looking forward to sleeping with a CPAP machine. But then if it actually helps me sleep better at night I’m all for it.

Irritability came back!

As part of maintenance therapy I was given a steroid. According to my chart, the steroid given to me via IV was dexamethasone sodium phosphate, also known as Hexadrol Phosphate. This was also the steroid used during my chemo infusions. The only difference between maintenance and chemo is that I no longer have to take the prednisone steroid. But just like during chemo I experience some extreme irritability for a couple of days.

Previously I blogged about the rage experienced while on prednisone. I was much less full of rage this time, but there was still a definite irritability. For a couple of days I seemed to get annoyed and almost angry every time the boys fought. As a parent I know the boys will fight for no reason at all. Yet on one of those days I had a large confrontation with my youngest son that left me apologizing to him for a couple of days. Hopefully the kids understand I was not quite myself on those days.

The chills!

The chills can get quite annoying!

Since my last round of chemo, I have experienced the chills occasionally when going to bed. I hadn’t really thought too much of this due to the fact it is very cold outside and it didn’t last very long. On a typical night prior to maintenance I would experience the chills for about five to ten minutes. After maintenance therapy, I now experience the chills for about forty-five to sixty minutes per evening. The chills always seem to come when I am going to bed. Nothing I do seem to get rid of them.

I’ve spoken with other lymphoma patients that have experienced the chills after chemo is completed. There doesn’t seem to be a unifying reason as to why some of us experience the chills. One common reason given is that chemo causes early menopause. Since I am not a woman I don’t really think that applies to me. Part of me wonders if it is not due to the rituximab. Rituximab is the common drug I used both during chemo and during maintenance therapy. And the chills is a common side-effect of the drug. I’m hoping as time goes on this particular side-effect will either go away or at least get reduced.

Not a lot of side-effects

I don’t seem to have a lot of side-effects from maintenance therapy. The main side-effects I have is lack of sleep, irritability, and the chills. Overall I can live with these side-effects if it means maintenance therapy can keep my lymphoma at bay longer. Plus I hope that as maintenance therapy goes on my body will just adjust better and the side-effects will reduce each time.

Today’s song: I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead

Today’s song comes from Warren Zevon. This track is called I’ll sleep when I’m dead. Since getting lymphoma my wife doesn’t like me to use the phrase I’ll sleep when I’m dead, but I actually have used it many times over the years. The song has some obvious references to living life to its fullest. But at the same time there are references to being stretched a little thin. So much to relate to in this song, especially when experiencing sleep issues!

Bonus song: Poor Poor Pitiful Me

Actually, this song isn’t about me at all. My constant companion throughout chemo and maintenance is Lucy. She is a nine-year-old Yorkie and is always at my side! Of course, just like any other dog she thinks her life is so rough, and I often sing this Warren Zevon song to her.

One thought on “The week and a half following the maintenance infusion

  1. Have Mindy shoot me your email address. I have 5 free 30 day passes to the Calm App. one of the things they have are sleep stories to lull you to sleep. I’ve heard great things about them. I suspect you have more going on than insomnia but it might help a bit.

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