The MRI went OK but seemed long

A couple of weeks ago, I posted about speaking with my MRI results with a neurologist. Since that post, I’ve had a few followers of the blog ask if I could document how the actual MRI of my head went. I can understand why they are requesting it. Going into a new type of scan can cause scanxiety. In this post, I will document what happened on the day of the MRI.

No prescan requirements

It seems a lot of procedures we cancer patients go through have conditions to meet. Most typically, we might be required to fast or refrain from eating sugary foods. For the MRI, there were no dietary restrictions given. The only restriction given to me was to refrain from wearing any clothing with metal in it. That was simple enough of a requirement to meet.

Filling out the paperwork

After being brought back to the scan area, I had to fill out a piece of paper. From what I remember, this was confirming my history with scans, medications, and anything metal in my body. At the time, I still had the port in my chest, so I think that was the only thing I had to note on that paperwork. 

Removing all metal

I was then put in a changing room with lockers and asked to remove any metal. That day I wore sweats, a hoodie, and flip flops (which I wear year-round). None of these items had metal in them. Those who do wear clothing with metal would have to take them off and wear a hospital gown. I didn’t want to wear a hospital gown, hence why I made sure I wore no metal. In my case, the only metal I had to take off was my glasses and the dental flipper device in my mouth.

Prescan conversation with tech

Before getting into the MRI, the tech let me know how the procedure would go. She said I would have to lay perfectly still the whole time for them to get a sharp image. About halfway through the process, she said I would get an injection of contrast via a needle. I was thrilled to hear a needle would be used to administer the contrast. I remember a previous scan (I believe it was a CT) where the contrast had to be taken orally, and I didn’t enjoy that at all!

She also said the machine would be very loud. This noise, she said, is caused by the magnets inside the machine. I was given a pair of earbuds and asked what kind of music I wanted to listen to (classic rock). Then she laid me back, and I was brought into the machine.

The first half of the scan

Actually, there isn’t much to report about the scan itself. I am not claustrophobic, so being inside a small tube didn’t bother me. I could, however, definitely see where someone afraid of small spaces would hate having an MRI done.

Even though the tech had warned me about the loud noises made by the MRI, I wasn’t adequately prepared for just how loud it would be. The MRI creates a large variety of sounds as it goes through its cycles. Some of the noises are so loud I could almost feel my eardrums being pounded. It is a wonder I didn’t come out of the MRI with a massive headache.

I believe the first part of the scan took about twenty minutes. Other than the loud noises, there isn’t much to report. It’s just a matter of laying still. Once in a while, the tech would say something through the headphones, I don’t remember much of what she said.

The second half of the scan

Upon completion of the first half of the scan, I heard the tech tell me I would be brought out of the machine for the contrast. She still wanted me to stay still during this process, or at least keep my head still. After injecting me with the contrast, she stuck me right back in the machine.

I think the second half of the scan took about the same amount of time as the first half. Part of me remembers hearing the tech say this part was shorter. But it didn’t seem shorter to me. By this time, my joints were starting to get sore from not being moved. I’m a person that has restless leg, and honestly, it takes a lot for me to keep still for twenty minutes at a time.

But I got through the second half of the scan OK. After the tech moved the bed out of the machine, she helped me slowly sit up. After a minute or two, she then helped me to stand. She explained this had to be done slowly because people will often fall after getting done with these scans. Falling is especially frequent if people try to stand right away.

I had to wait around for just a few minutes while someone verified the images were adequate. After getting the word, I was released and went off to the waiting room to let my wife know we could get out of there.

It was just a scan

A lot of people going into various types of scans often get scanxiety. Of course, a lot of that scanxiety is caused by worrying about the scan results. But after speaking with enough people, I’ve found many people (including myself at various times in the past) get a fair amount of anxiety about the scan itself. Hopefully, by sharing how my MRI experience went, it will help others relieve any scanxiety they have about getting an MRI.

Song of the day: Basket Case

I believe I have featured this song before as song of the day. I just can’t help but think of this song when talking about scanxiety. I was never a huge Green Day fan, but this is a good track.

Bonus Song: Everlong

Since I’m in a 90’s alt rock mood I might as well bring out this great track from the Foo Fighters. The scan seemed to take forever in the second half, which brought this great track to mind.

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