I’m not living in fear of the coronavirus, but I am taking a few precautions

You can’t go anywhere without reading or hearing about the coronavirus. While the coronavirus is something to be wary of, I have decided not to live in fear of the virus. That being said, I have been taking a few extra precautions, just in case. In this post, I will briefly discuss why I don’t fear the coronavirus and what changes I have made.

Before going on, I will say this is just my perspective and what I am doing. I am not judging anyone who acts differently or saying anyone else should feel and act as I am. Each person has their own circumstances and experiences.

Why I don’t fear the coronavirus

I covered this topic in a post two weeks ago. Here is what I said at that time:

I live in a rural portion of a rural state. There isn’t a lot of people that live in Mina, SD. Yes, I work in Aberdeen, which is a much bigger city. But Aberdeen itself is pretty much in the middle of nowhere. Is it possible for something like the Coronavirus to make its way here? Yes, it is possible. But right now, I would instead prefer to focus on living life. I will deal with anything like the Coronavirus when and if it makes its way here.

Yes, my immune system does dive every eight weeks after getting my Rituximab infusion. But it doesn’t go down near as much as when I was getting full-blown chemotherapy infusions. Actually, I’m more nervous about my memory issues than I am about a compromised immune system.

I think the above paragraphs include why I’m not living in fear pretty well. The idea of living in fear doesn’t seem like living to me.

Another reason I’m possibly not living in fear was brought up by a friend after I wrote the post referenced above. I’m an Army veteran. At age 18, I had to prepare a will get into the mind-frame that I would die. That mind frame was reenforced through a deployment to Bosnia and missions to other countries. Actually, I’m more worried about PTSD eventually impacting me than I am about a virus.

What the CDC has to say

I’ve heard many people reference the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Oddly though, after speaking with many people who talk about the CDC recommendations, I found that few have read what the CDC has to say. The CDC is only recommending actions for those who are “higher risk.” Here is who the CDC says is at higher risk:

  • Older adults
  • People who have serious chronic medical conditions like:
    • Heart disease
    • Diabetes
    • Lung disease

Well, I have follicular lymphoma, so I have a severe chronic medical condition. The site does have recommended actions for people who are at high risk. While I’m not going to barricade myself in my house, there are some precautions I am taking.

The precautions I am taking

Even though I’m not living in fear, I am still taking a few precautions. Mostly I am avoiding crowds of people. There are a concert and a movie I wanted to attend later this month. I have canceled my plans for both of these events. Just because I’m not living in fear, it doesn’t mean I want to take unwarranted risks in public. I have my next maintenance infusion in a couple of weeks, and I plan to be healthy when it is time to get that poison in my veins once again.

Another precaution I had taken was to cancel a plan to attend a parade in Sioux Falls. The charity cosplay group I am a part of planned to march in the St Patty’s Day parade. Initially, I had declined to join the event due to being busy at work. When I realized my schedule would allow it, I had possibly planned on attending the event. But then this whole coronavirus thing happened, and I realized going to the parade would probably not be smart for people with compromised immune systems such as me. In the end, it doesn’t matter because the parade organizers canceled the event anyhow.

Basically just avoiding large crowds

I guess all of my “precautions” could be summed up as “I’m avoiding large crowds.” Maybe if the virus spreads to a higher degree than it has, I may take more precautions. Even if that happens, I won’t live my life in fear. I’ll take extra precautions and keep living life how I want to live it. If I do take additional precautions, that will likely involve spending more time with the wife and kids, so that might not be so bad.

Song of the day: Don’t Stop Believing

Why not go back to Journey for some inspirational music. I think that is the prescription for all the negativity going on in social media right now.

Bonus Song: Hysteria

Ever since this coronavirus thing hit the media, I’ve had the song hysteria stuck in my head. Different people react in different ways to virus outbreaks. The only thing I wish would change is the media. I believe certain media outlets have exaggerated the virus outbreak for ratings.. This also happens to be a good love song from Def Leppard.

Helping my wife through this cancer thing

Hanging out with my wife

Cancer sucks. It not only affects the person who has cancer, but also many family members and friends. In my case, my wife has taken on the role of my primary caregiver. Being a caregiver for a loved one is hard! In this post, I’ll briefly discuss how I am trying to help her help me.

I’ll help you through this

Back when I received my cancer diagnosis, I remember visiting with my wife on our deck. I could tell she didn’t know whether to be angry, to cry, or scream. I remember telling her, “don’t worry, I’ll help you through this.” She just stared at me and said: “but I’m supposed to be helping you!”. That is a moment I will never forget.

Looking back, I think we were both right. In so many ways, my wife has been the perfect caregiver, especially when I go through treatments. She spent hours sanitizing our house when I had to go through chemo. My wife continually goes out of her way to keep sick people away from me. At every medical appointment, my wife is there. Of the very few appointments my wife hasn’t made, she sets up someone to be with me and worries the whole time. It appears to me that my wife spends more time worrying about my health than anything else. 

I’ve tried many ways to care for my wife while she is taking care of me. The only thing that seems to work is to spend time with her. When I think about it, I reassure her I am not going anywhere anytime soon. I try to let my wife know just how much I appreciate everything she is doing for me. That even includes the times she nags me to be careful when going into a public event, such as a concert. I keep trying to assure her I will be there for her.

Assuring her I’m here is the key

Part of me wishes I could do more for my wife. And yes, I do try to do more for her. But in the end, all she seems to want is an assurance that I am not going anywhere. If anyone out there is in a similar situation, I would let your caregiver know just how much you appreciate what they are doing. If that caregiver is a spouse or family member, I would recommend assuring them you plan to stick around for quite a while. Fighting this cancer shit can suck at times, but with the help of a great caregiver (especially a wonderful wife), the battle doesn’t have to suck quite as much.

Song of the day: Stand By Me

I think this classic song performed by Ben E King says it all.

Bonus Song: Lean On Me

Another song that I think says it all. A few good remakes have been recorded of this song, but I’m sharing the original from Bill Withers. It’s just such a great song with an important message.