Round six of chemo done, yes I’m still blogging

Last round of R-CHOP chemo done!

It has been a few weeks since I have been able to blog. As I mentioned in my last blog each round of chemo has hit me harder. Round six was no exception to this trend. But I do have good news, I am now done with my R-CHOP chemo! And now that I am past the hump created by my sixth round of chemo I can get back to regular blogging again!

Last week I had my sixth and final round of R-CHOP chemo. The oncologist met with me prior to my round six chemo injection. She had determined based upon the PET scan I had done after round three and other factors that going past six rounds of chemo would not be necessary. I was so happy to hear this news. The fifth round of chemo had really beat me down and the thought of having three more rounds seemed impossible. She did mention however that I would have another PET scan and have to get a bone-marrow biopsy done to ensure the cancer is gone from my bones. If there is still active cancer in my bones she will come up with a plan of action based upon the PET scan and biopsy results. I am more than happy to move on from R-CHOP chemo and possibly on to other treatment options. Although honestly I just hope the R-CHOP kicked the cancer out of my bones and I can just start my two years of maintenance injections.

After the oncologist gave me the good news I had my sixth and final round of R-CHOP chemo. As with the other times receiving chemo I don’t remember much; the Benadryl really did a number on me. Recovery from this round of chemo has been particularly hard on me. For the last week and a half I feel like every part of me has been on the losing side of a boxing match. My energy levels were also at all-time lows. The few times I had to go out and see anyone in public I would use an energy drink and put every bit of energy into seeming normal. Such outings would leave me completely without energy for a day or so. During that time my wonderful boys really stepped up and helped me any way they could. I could not be more proud of them!

Yesterday I finally felt half-way normal. To celebrate I spent the afternoon ice fishing. Again the boys really helped me by getting my stuff out to the ice and helped me bring it back to the house afterwards. I didn’t catch any fish worth keeping, just a dozen or so perch that really weren’t big enough for anything. The lack of catching bigger fish really didn’t bother me though. I was just happy to get out of the house.

Today I feel even better. For the first time in a few weeks I actually feel good enough blog again. I plan to take a trip up north to help move my oldest son. Even though I won’t be much help in actually moving his stuff, I can still drive my pickup to help him out. Hopefully this upward trend can continue! And hopefully I don’t overdo anything; as I really do get tired and wore-out very quickly.

I’ll end this post here. This post was really about getting an update out there about my status. Also I wanted to ensure everyone knew I was still blogging. Actually I have the topics for dozens of blogs ready to go for this year. I just needed to energy to start blogging again. I appreciate the many messages I received during the past few weeks asking if I was OK. It never occurred to me that a lack of blogging by me would even be noticed. Again, thank-you to everyone out there for the support.

Bonus song!

Now that I’m feeling better I can’t get this classic from Robert Earl Keen out of my head.

Each round of chemo gets harder on the body

Last week I had round five of chemo. My blogging has been somewhat lacking since receiving my latest round of infusion drugs. Partly this has been due to my being busy with other projects. But honestly a bigger reason is because I feel just plain beat down. Each round of chemo seems to get harder on the body.

Overall I really can’t complain about the side-effects I’ve had while on chemo. The main side-effects I experience are brain fog, insomnia, and bone pain. I don’t experience debilitating nausea like some on chemo experience. But I have noticed over the last few rounds of chemo that each time I just feel more run down. Of course the lack of sleep may have a lot to do with this run-down feeling.

Over the last few days I’ve been reading the experiences of a lot of cancer patients, especially for those on the chemo regiment I am taking (R-CHOP). I can’t help but think of Forrest Gump when reading through these stories. I can hear him saying something like “Chemo is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’ll get.” With so many possible side-effects it almost seems that each persons experience with chemo is truly unique. Plus many people on chemo, including myself, appear to have their chemo experience change each round. In my case it appears to get worse each time. But other chemo patients appear to have fewer side-effects with each round.

Today, a week after my latest round of chemo, I actually feel pretty good. It does make me wonder what round six of chemo will be like for me in two weeks. Theoretically that could be my last round of chemo, which at this point I wonder how worn down I will feel after that round. I guess I’ll find out in two weeks.

My port mostly worked for round 5 of chemo

Last week I blogged about the catheter connected to my port being retracted. The surgeon didn’t think this would be an issue for receiving my chemo infusion. Yesterday had I round 5 of my chemo infusion and the port worked fine for receiving drugs from the IV, but not for taking blood draws. In this post I will share that story.

The chemo appointment started as it normally does. One of the nurses accessed my port by connecting a needle contraption through my skin into the port. She then proceeded to flush the port, which the surgeon said might actually undo the retraction. The port flushed fine and there didn’t seem to be any resistance. That was good. But then the nurse went to take a blood draw from the port and she was unable to get anything to return. Her and another nurse tried multiple flushes, I think around eight or so. For some of those tries they had me move my neck into different positions to see if that would help. Nothing made a difference. The flush would go through the catheter fine, but no blood would come back when trying to get a blood sample. After speaking to the surgeon over the phone, the nurse said we would get an x-ray to see what was going on with the catheter now.

As a recap this is the picture previously posted to recreate what my x-ray looked about a month and a half ago. In this picture the catheter is correctly going from the port, up to the neck and down through my jugular, and stopping just outside of the heart.

port

This next picture is how the port looked about a week and a half ago. Looking at this picture is shows the catheter being retracted into a loop. The end of the catheter is also further away from the heart due to the loop.

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Finally, here is a recreation of the x-ray from yesterday. The loop is gone, but now the catheter is in a J shape in the jugular.

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After viewing the x-ray I received a visit from the surgeon. He believed flushing the port must have caused the end of the catheter to straighten out. But it was not strong enough to completely extend the catheter. Since the catheter is still in the jugular and not in a smaller vein, the surgeon decided it was OK to proceed on to chemo with the catheter as it is. He noted the blood draw would have to be done on my arm. He also did a couple of flushes to ensure there was no resistance. He also verified blood draws were not possible. At the end of his visit he said we would look at this again in a few weeks after round 6 of chemo is done. After that he would be comfortable fixing the catheter, since I will hopefully be done with chemo treatments. My PET scan after the sixth round will decide if I have to go a full eight treatments. But my PET scan after round three looked good, so I hopeful the next PET scan will show no active cancer in my bones. If I have to go a full eight rounds I’ll speak with the surgeon to see what the plan will be then.

After the surgeon left, a tech from the lab came to take my blood. As usual my numbers were looking good. Each round of chemo my blood numbers have looked good and recovered well from the previous round of chemo.

Finally it was time to receive the drugs through my port. The saline bag flowed fine. Then the antibiotics were put through the IV and they ran fine. All of the drugs the nurse put in through the IV flowed fine.

Hopefully the catheter will be fine for round six of chemo, which happens to be scheduled for the day after Christmas. Fluids flowing from the port to the jugular are working good. The only problem right now is that the port cannot be used to do blood draws. Basically my ports catheter is acting as a check valve. Of all the problems one can have with a catheter or port this one isn’t so bad. But it is something that will eventually have to be dealt with. After I’m done with chemo I’ll have two years of rituximab maintenance infusions.

My port catheter has retracted. Huh?

This week I had to visit my surgeon due to a retracted catheter coming from my port. It ended up not being a big deal. But I will have to keep an eye on it in case the surgeon has to do a repair. In this post I will share how I found out about the retracted port and my experience to figure out what the heck that even means.

My current adventure began last week; specifically on Tuesday, November 22, when I went to see the pulmonary doctor. Actually this adventure really started a few months ago I had been referred to a Pulmonologists for my breathing problems (some of which are documented here). I had to wait a few months in order to see the pulmonary specialist. Of course in the meantime a CT scan found my windpipe was being restricted by a lymph node. Additionally, just a few days after my first round of chemo the lymph node pushing on my windpipe had shrunk and allowed me to breathe again (hallelujah!). Even though my breathing was better I decided not to cancel the appointment with the pulmonologist. I still have some breathing problems, sleeping problems, and questions about how my lungs will recover from the cancer that spread into one of them.

The appointment with the pulmonary doctor actually went pretty quick. He looked at what was done so far and wanted to start off with a sleep study (which I’ll do in a about a month or so) and an X-Ray. After those steps are done he will decide what more should be done about my breathing problems. Thinking back I completely forgot to ask him about the effects of the cancer on my lung; oh well, I’ll save that for next time I see him.

Later that afternoon the nurse called me back to let me know the x-ray had come back looking good. Fluid that had been in my lungs in the past was gone. That was good news. All I had to do now in regards to the pulmonary doctor was wait to have my sleep study. It never occurred to me that having an X-Ray would lead to a visit with another doctor.

Late Friday of that week the results of the x-ray were released to my online chart. I don’t actually get to see the scan, but I can view the lab tech notes. Out of curiosity I decided to log on and review these notes. Here is part of what I saw in the impression section:

1. The catheter of the right chest wall port has retracted and the tip now projects in the region of the confluence of the right IJ vein and innominate vein.

Huh? My catheter had retracted? I couldn’t help but wonder what that meant. It sounded potentially bad. The catheter being referred to in the notes goes from the port just under the skin on my chest, up into the jugular in my neck, and down to just outside the heart. It is through that port and catheter that I receive my chemo treatments. I began to worry that a problem with my port would cause a problem with my chemo IV infusions.

I did try calling the oncology office, but it was late and they were already gone for the day. So I set up an appointment to speak with the surgeon who put in the port. There were problems with my port install originally, so I though it would be best to hear from him what was going on. Plus I like the surgeon. He knows how to explain things to people who don’t have a medical degree (something not all doctors are able to do).

On Wednesday of this week I had my appointment with the surgeon. I am glad I chose to speak with him. He was quickly able to reassure me there wasn’t a major problem. To explain the retracted catheter he first showed an x-ray of my chest that had been done about a month and a half ago. Below is my attempt to draw what I saw on this x-ray.

port

The triangle is the port, which is just under the skin on my chest. Connected to the port is the catheter. It runs under the skin up to the base of my neck, where it enters the jugular and travels to the heart. The surgeon said in this x-ray the port and catheter look exactly like they are supposed to.

Below I have attempted to draw what I saw on the new x-ray.

portretracted

This x-ray shows there is a loop in the catheter between the neck and heart. The formation of this loop means the catheter is no longer right next to heart. Or in medical speak it is apparently “retracted”.

The surgeon noted catheters can retract, but he hadn’t seen one retract this far before. It could have been caused by scar tissue. We also talked about whether my lymph nodes shrinking had caused issues. I had a LOT of lymph nodes in my chest which had grown large and hard due to the cancer. When those lymph nodes shrunk the very topology of my body would have changed. It’s possible we will never figure out exactly why the retraction occurred.

Of course then I asked what had to be done about it. He noted the catheter did not appear to be pinched at all and it should work fine. If needed he can do a simple procedure to straighten out the catheter. Basically that would mean a small incision by the port, where he would stick a wire down the catheter to force it back into its original position. Even though that would be a minor procedure, he really didn’t want to do it while I’m still in chemotherapy. The surgeon also noted that when my port gets flushed during the next round of chemo the catheter may be forced to straighten out. He didn’t think that was likely, but it is possible.

In the short-term the surgeon said we wouldn’t do anything about this retraction. If problems with flow are seen during chemo then he would fix it. But if the chemo IV flows fine he would rather wait and do an x-ray in six months to see how the catheter looks then. In the short-term he said a retraction such as this really isn’t a big deal. However over the long-term, such as ten years, if I am still using the same port he will want it fixed sooner rather than later. He explained that as times goes on the bend in the catheter’s rubber could begin to degrade and cause a leak. It really depends on how long I will keep this port and catheter in. Right now I have one or two months of chemo left, plus two years of maintenance infusions. Hopefully after that this port comes out.

I guess I am back to my rambling ways as this post went longer than planned. In this post I shared my experience of finding out about a retracted catheter. More importantly I shared my experience learning what the heck a retracted port even is. Its times like this I miss the days when I would go years without seeing a doctor.

The ups and downs of Prednisone during chemo

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Steroid Rage!

Chemo is hard on the mind and body. That almost goes without saying. But it isn’t just the chemo drugs that wreak havoc, some of the other drugs taken by chemo patients can have some major side-effects. In this post I will write about one of those drugs: Prednisone.

 

I am on a chemo regiment called R-CHOP. The “P” in R-CHOP stands for Prednisone, a type of steroid typically used for its anti-inflammatory properties. As part of R-CHOP Prednisone is actually used because it can “stimulate programmed cell death” in some cancer cell types. During the beginning of each three-week chemo cycle I take 100mg of Prednisone each day for five days. Since it is not an actual chemo drug, I really didn’t think it had any side-effects I would have to watch out for. Boy was I wrong.

When I first began chemo I noted Prednisone made me very hungry. This is still very much true. Unlike many chemo patients I have not lost any weight since starting treatment. Actually I am almost twenty pounds up since I first began chemo. The constant hunger during the week I am on Prednisone is basically insatiable. I won’t really complain about this side-effect too much. Recently I have found through smart diet and getting exercise I can counter-act the weight gain. After I’m done with chemo (and Prednisone) I’ll worry about losing those pounds I gained.

A side-effect of Prednisone I will complain about however is the mood swings. One moment I will be watching a movie and almost in tears because a character in said movie died, and the next moment I will feel great rage because my boys are fighting about nothing again. When I feel that great rage I have been trying to walk away. The boys are brothers, and they are going to fight. My yelling at them in a steroid rage is not going to do any good at all. It is hard to walk away though. When I get this great rage it feels like I have to let it out. Shortly thereafter I will find myself going to the boys and apologizing. They don’t know why I’m apologizing, other than the fact I’ve told them some of the drugs I am on for chemo can make me act strange. The wife and kids have been great about putting up with the mood swings during chemo week. Hopefully they will continue to understand and be patient for the next couple of treatment cycles.

While the mood swings from being on Prednisone is bad, it’s the withdrawals from the steroid that really gets to me. On Sunday of this week I finished my fourth cycle of Prednisone. During the days I am on Prednisone I actually feel pretty dang good (except for the mood swings). However the couple of days after no longer taking Prednisone I crash hard. The day after I start to feel weak with aches and pains cropping up all over my body. This gets worse for about two days. Yesterday, Tuesday, I felt so weak and sore that all I wanted to do was curl up in a ball and ignore the world. I don’t know if these symptoms are truly from withdrawal. It could be that the anti-inflammatory properties of Prednisone hide the aches and pains while I am taking the drug. Either way I feel like I’ve been hit by a truck for a couple of days after I’m done with the Prednisone.

I’ve spoken with other chemo patients who have similar experiences after coming off Prednisone. One person I spoke with had their oncologist prescribe something to taper down the withdrawal. I don’t really think this is necessary for me. Hopefully I only have two cycles of chemo left and feel I can cope with these symptoms now that I know about them.

One of the chemo patients I’ve spoken with also noted she experiences depression for a couple of days after coming down from Prednisone. I don’t think I experienced depression, but its hard to know. I definitely feel emotionally “down” after coming off Prednisone. If that counts as depression it is hard to say. This down feeling goes away after a couple of days. In fact today, Wednesday, I feel pretty upbeat and the emotional side-effects of Prednisone appear to be gone.

With only a couple of rounds of chemo left I won’t worry too much about the side-effects of Prednisone. I mostly shared my Prednisone experience in this post so other chemo patients suffering side-effects from the steroid know they are not alone. It is also my hope that friends and family of chemo patients suffering side-effects from Prednisone will get an understanding of what those patients are going through.

The second PET scan looked good!

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Kicking the cancer into remission means being able to spend more time with my boys and I am better able to take care of Ashton on the days he cannot walk!

Last Wednesday I had my second PET scan done to see how well my first three rounds chemo has been working at pushing the lymphoma back. Friday of last week I posted about the scanxiety of waiting for those results. Luckily over the weekend the notes about the scan had been released and it appeared to be good news. Yesterday during my scheduled round of chemo I had an appointment with my oncologist so I could actually see the scan images and get her take on the scan notes. Overall I will say it is great news!

 

The original PET scan reminded me of a fireworks display show. This scan looked nothing like that. Previously I had what appeared to be dozens of lymph nodes from neck to groin lit up with cancerous activity. This time there were no lymph nodes showing any activity. In the first scan my spleen was very over-sized and most of was showing cancerous activity. This time my spleen was almost down to a normal size and showed no cancerous activity. One of my lungs showed quite a bit of cancerous activity. With this scan there was no presence of cancerous activity. I was ecstatic to see this dramatic change.

The cancerous activity was not all gone. My bones still show activity in them. But that cancerous activity is greatly diminished from what it was. The oncologist says it is normal for the bones to take longer. She did say she is happy with the progress made on the bones, even if it is not as far along to being in remission as the rest of the cancer is. I guess bones take a lot longer to heal.

In the notes from the imagine expert it was noted that I have sinusitis. I was given a Z-Pack prescription to take care of this. Despite my best efforts to keep germs and bacteria away, I must have picked up a cold from somewhere. Luckily it isn’t anything too serious. I actually already figured I had something going on with my sinuses for the last week or two due to a stuffed/runny nose and coughing. But part of me thought it was just a side-effect from a chemo drug or fall allergies. Actually I wonder if fall allergies lowered my immune system even lower so I was able to catch some sort of cold.

I just finished my fourth round of chemo today. After six rounds I will have another PET scan done to see if I can stop there or have to go the full eight rounds. I am really hoping I only have to do six rounds. This chemo stuff is very hard on the body and mind. If things go right my final round of chemo will fall on the day after Christmas. That should make for a happy holiday season.

PS. You may have noticed I said I spoke with my Oncologist on the day I was scheduled to have chemo. My chemo was postponed a day due to the hood used by the pharmacist while mixing chemo was broke down on Tuesday for a time. It was repaired and I did chemo today (Wednesday) with no problems. I don’t blame the pharmacist for not wanting to mix chemo chemicals without proper ventilation, this stuff is very toxic!

R-CHOP, the chemo regiment I’m on

21746916A follower of this blog noticed I’ve mentioned R-CHOP often as being the chemotherapy regiment I’m on. She asked if I could briefly explain what this means as she is about to start R-CHOP chemo herself. The doctor did give her information about R-CHOP, but it was basically just a sheet explaining the many side-effects which are possible. In this post I will try to briefly explain what R-CHOP is.

What is R-CHOP

R-CHOP is a chemotherapy used specifically to treat non-Hodgkin lymphoma. R-CHOP actually is actually an acronym for the five drugs that are used together to best battle the lymphoma. Combinations of drugs are often used in chemo. The five drugs which make up R-CHOP are as follows:

  • Rituximab
  • Cyclophosphamide
  • Doxorubicin (Hydroxydaunomycin)
  • Vincristine (Oncovin)
  • Prednisone

Explanation of each drug in R-CHOP

Only three of these drugs are actually chemo therapies. One is a targeted therapy drug and another is a steroid. Here is a further breakdown of these five drugs.

Rituximab

Rituximab is not actually considered a chemo drug. Instead it is a type of targeted therapy drug known as a monoclonal antibody. Here is what cancer research UK has to say about this drug:

Monoclonal antibodies target proteins on the surface of cells. Rituximab targets a protein known as CD20. CD20 is found on white blood cells called B cells. It is the B cells that are cancerous in the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Rituximab attaches itself to the B cells and marks them. The cells of the immune system recognize the marked cells and kill them.

It is a pretty cool idea to use the body’s own immune system to fight cancer. Rituximab is given via IV just like the chemo drugs. It is also the drug that makes the first round of chemo last seemingly forever. This drug has a lot of potentially nasty side-effects and the first IV has to be done very slowly to determine if the drug can be safely used for a patient.

Cyclophosphamide

Cyclophosphamide is one of the three chemo drugs. It is classified as a “cytotoxic agent” due to it being toxic to both bad and good cells. This drug is given through the IV.

Doxorubicin (Hydroxydaunomycin)

Doxorubicin is also a chemo drug. This may be prescribed as Adriamycin. It is given through an IV. Cancer patents often know this drug as the “red devil”. I have to agree with this name. The drug is deep red. It looks like a poison to me, but I’ve heard other say it looks very cool. It is also very dangerous if it leaks on the skin or out of a vein. But it is also a very effective chemo drug, so I find the risk worth it.

Vincristine (Oncovin)

Vincristine is the third and final chemo drug in the R-CHOP regiment. It is also given through an IV.

Prednisone

This is actually a steroid, and not a chemo drug at all. Some patients have Prednisolone instead of Prednisone during their R-CHOP treatment. This is taken as a pill instead of through the IV. In fact I take this the day of chemo, and the four days following. While prednisone has anti-inflammatory properties, it is used in this chemo regiment because it can “stimulate programmed cell deaths“.

How often is R-CHOP given

R-CHOP is typically given every three weeks. Each three-week period is called a cycle. I’ve read about two-week cycles, but honestly I can’t imagine being so aggressive with R-CHOP unless it was absolutely necessary. R-CHOP can last up to 8 cycles. In my case I was told I would likely be on R-CHOP for 6 to 8 cycles. As I write this post I am actually preparing for my fourth cycle. Today I should either be half way done or two-thirds of the way done with my chemo treatment. The results of my PET scan will help determine that.

Other thoughts on R-CHOP

I’ve heard of R-CHOP being referred to as a “shotgun approach” due to the mixture of drugs. I don’t think this is an unfair assessment of R-CHOP as a treatment. One of the problems with certain blood cancers, such as some types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), is that they are not curable and can only be pushed into remission. NHL patients often have to wait for their symptoms to be bad enough for treatment. When they finally get that treatment they want it to be as potent as possible to help prevent the need for further treatments any time soon. Personally I am thankful R-CHOP treatment exists. At the same time though I hope new treatment options are created in the future which aren’t so hard on the body. And yes, R-CHOP is very hard on the body.

Fall allergies while on chemo

Cleaning up Yard during AutumnEarlier this week I noted there wouldn’t be any real post that day due to not feeling very well and my brain fog being too thick. For the last few days it has been hard to put thoughts together and breathing has been very hard. Luckily today I seem to be back to normal and believe it was in fact fall allergies which took me down for the last few days.

One thing I love about our home is that we have a lot of old trees surrounding the house. Of course that also means a lot of leaves. Sunday of this week was a very nice day. It was slightly cool, but there was no wind at all. This was perfect for one last time to clean the leaves in the yard. I spent a few hours in the afternoon with my leaf-blower and hauled a full pickup load of leaves to the dump site. Not only did I feel that something was accomplished by removing all the leaves, I also got some good exercise in.

It didn’t occur to me at the time to worry about my fall allergies. I am already taking Claritin every day. I partially take Claritin to combat fall allergies; and partially to combat the side-effects of certain drugs I am taking; more specifically Claritin helps battle the side-effects of Neulasta and Xgeva. Even though Claritin does a fine job of keeping fall allergies at bay, it does have its limits. I apparently found those limits by using a leaf blower to shoot a lot of allergens into the air.

I didn’t exactly have my normal fall allergy symptoms. Typically during fall I get a runny nose, my sinuses feel plugged, and my head feels like it is going to explode. This time I had a little bit of a runny nose, but I don’t believe my sinuses were clogged at all. My head didn’t feel like it was going to explode either. Instead I had a harder time breathing and I just felt “off”. Additionally my brain fog seemed to really get thick. I just couldn’t put any thoughts together at all. Finally today, four days later, I feel almost back to normal (well the new normal for me being on chemo).

This morning I was in contact with another cancer patient going through chemo. She has a similar experience when doing yard work. To combat this she has to take a shower immediately after doing any yard work and ensure she doesn’t come in contact with the clothes she was wearing again until after they have been washed. Additionally if she has done something like raking she will put the blue mask on. That day I did not take a shower until the evening. Now I know to do that right away.

Now that there is a light layer of snow on the ground hopefully fall allergies won’t be an issue. Furthermore, if my treatments go right I hopefully won’t be on chemo come spring when I have to worry about allergies again. Either way I now know my body definitely reacts differently to fall allergies than it used to. I guess it’s just one more thing to watch out for while on chemo.

The blue mask

SONY DSCIt is Halloween today! This is a day where a lot of kids and adults wear masks to pretend they are someone or something else. In the past my wife and I have held Halloween parties and dressed up in couples costumes (my favorite was me as a gunslinger and her as a barmaid). Between my being on chemo and us traveling to get our youngest son seen by a specialist, no costumes or parties are happening this year. Even so I will be wearing a mask this year, it just happens to be the mask I wear every time I go out now that I am on chemo. In this post I will blog briefly about the blue mask.

Since I’ve started chemo I tend to stay out of public as much as possible. My immune system gets trashed by the drugs I’m taking and I have to do everything I can to reduce the risk of catching any viruses or diseases. Of course that doesn’t stop me from going to events my kids are participating in. When I do go out I wear the blue mask.

Wearing the blue mask and being bald definitely makes me stand out. I’ve noticed everyone looking at me while trying to make it seem as if they aren’t looking at me. That really doesn’t bother me. The best is the times I have to go into the school for my youngest sons. When going through the elementary there are some younger children who say hi to me and ask if I am a doctor. That always gives me a smile.

I’ve been in contact with other chemo patients that don’t wear the blue mask. Some of them believe the blue mask does very little or they don’t want attention drawn to them. Personally I think the extra precaution is warranted, especially since it is such an easy step to take in order to protect myself. Actually there has been a lot of cases of pertussis (whooping cough) going around at the schools. I really don’t want whooping cough while my immune system is compromised. So I will continue to wear my blue mask when out in public.

Tonight I will be around my little nieces. While they are dressed in their costumes I will be dressed in mine: a surgeon! I guess I am dressing up for Halloween after all.

My wife thought chemo went differently yesterday

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The wife fretting over me.

Yesterday I blogged about my third round of chemo. Overall I felt it went well, even with my blood pressure dropping quite a bit. My wife Mind however remembers yesterday differently. In this post I will briefly blog about how she though this round of chemo went.

 

First off Mindy agrees that my blood pressure was dropping. But she doesn’t see it as being no big deal. In fact her and one of the nurses were worried a bit because my blood pressure was dropping much quicker than it had the previous two rounds of chemo. My initial blood pressure was 130/68. It was 99/52 the last time it was checked. Telling her this is a known possible side-effect doesn’t make Mindy feel any better. It is just one of the things my poor wife has to worry about while I am on chemo.

Another thing other thing Mindy worried about yesterday was my dizziness. During this round dizziness seemed to be a larger side effect that it had been in the past. Even if I got up slowly to go the bathroom I would experience some dizziness. Mindy said it looked like I was about to fall over and I was very unsteady walking to and from the bathroom. I really think she wishes I would have called the nurse. But I couldn’t see calling a nurse for doing something so simple as walking to the bathroom. Mindy might have been right though…

Finally Mindy mentioned I was not sleeping as hard as I had during the previous two rounds of chemo. The Benadryl definitely knocked me out. But this time she said I would keep sitting forward in my chair and it would look like I was about to tip forward out of said chair. I don’t recall doing this. But I expect I was doing so because my back pain has been getting worse over the last few weeks. The shot I take to rebuild my bone marrow probably has something to do with my back pain getting worse. Sometimes the shots of pain I get are debilitating. But it doesn’t last long at high levels of pain and usually settles down to about a six on my pain scale. Mindy was definitely worried about this happening during chemo and me possibly falling forward onto my face.

I’ve said it before that chemo is hard on my body. It is also hard on my psyche at times. But I think in some ways Mindy is under much more mental stress due to my cancer than I am. It doesn’t help matters that we have a son with medical problem just as bad if not worse than my own. Hopefully I can find a way to reduce some of the stress on Mindy. She really has been a large reason I have coped so well with cancer so well.