The future of DadAgainstCancer

I’ve had many people ask me if I will stop blogging about cancer now that I am in remission. The simple straightforward answer is no, I am not done blogging. Since I like to ramble on I will use the rest of this post to give a much longer answer as to what I will be doing on this blog.

First and foremost I will continue to document my experiences as a cancer patient. Unfortunately Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma cannot currently be cured. For the next two years I will be going through maintenance infusions, bone-marrow injections, and who knows what else. I will also document doctors visits which may or may not be related to my cancer. This includes my second sleep study and dealing with pulmonary issues.

Second, I will expand upon topics covered previously while on chemo. This includes insights from family members as to how they felt about my having cancer. I recently found out my chemo was experience was even harder on family members than I understood. They tried hard to hide their fears and put up with my wild steroid mood swings.

Third, I will be sharing stories of other cancer patients and survivors. In fact just today I came close to completing a deal with a cancer advocacy website to do a series of videos interviewing cancer patients and survivors. I am very excited about this opportunity. Right now it appears the videos will focus on how cancer impacts families, work, and other people around cancer patients. If the videos become popular enough I also hope to start a podcast dealing with the same topics.

Finally, I plan to take requests about blog topics. There are a few blog topics I already have in queue from requests. This includes posts on hair loss, dealing with family while on Prednisone, and learning how to cope with people who think you are already dead due to cancer. If anyone has something they would like me to blog about please feel free to use the contact me portion of the website. If it is a topic I don’t have a lot of personal experience with I will research it or call on an expert. We can all learn something new that way!

I would like to thank everyone who has been religiously reading this blog. Writing this blog has made my personal cancer experience go smoother. I hope it in some way has helped others who have been impacted by cancer.

The Futures So Bright, I Gotta Write Blogs!

I can’t go without a bonus song. Here is a song from the mid-80’s by Timbuk 3. Since being in remission I have had this song pop into my head a few times.

I’m in remission… most likely

Yesterday I had an appointment with my oncologist. Going into this appointment my wife and I were hoping to hear that I am in remission. We kinda heard that. So I am very happy to say that I in remission. In this post I’ll go further into why I say I kinda heard I am in remission.

Two weeks ago I posted about going in for a bone marrow biopsy. This was done because my PET scan showed possible cancerous activity in my pelvis. The rest of my PET scan looked good and it would have appeared chemo worked 100% if it had not been for that spot on my pelvis. To ensure I am in remission my oncologist ordered a bone marrow biopsy for me. My experience of going through the bone marrow biopsy can be read here. Truth be told I hope to never go through another bone marrow biopsy.

During yesterday’s appointment the oncologist let my wife and I know the results of the biopsy tests. All but one of the tests had been completed. They all came back negative for active cancer. That is great news and theoretically I am now in remission. There is still one test she was waiting for from Mayo. Even though she didn’t think that test would change anything, she was reluctant to actually say I am in remission. I guess I can understand she is just trying to be conservative. Yet at the same time the main biopsy test that most likely would have shown any active cancer showed negative. I’m sticking with that test and calling myself in remission until told otherwise!

Also during yesterdays appointment we discussed maintenance infusions of Rituximab. Starting February 20th I will start my maintenance infusions. This was a tough decision for me and I will cover in a different post why I decided to go ahead with maintenance infusions over the next two years.

I also found out during yesterdays appointment that the results of my sleep study were ready. It was two weeks ago that I had the sleep study done and I must admit I hadn’t thought a lot about it since then. The oncologist told me the sleep study showed I do have sleep apnea and that a second sleep study will need to be setup to get me properly set up with a CPAP machine. Oh goody… Oh well, maybe that will help me sleep better at night.

I want to end this post on a good note. As far as I know I am now in remission! This is a great way to start 2019 and I look forward to spending a lot of time with my wife and kids this year and for many years to come!

Bonus Song – Feeling good again

I’ve posted versions of this song a couple of times on this blog. Now I will do so again. I can’t help but feel good about being in remission! This is a very good unplugged version of the song; even if the lack of a steel guitar is noticeable.

Glad I wore the blue mask during chemo

No, I don’t normally blog with the blue mask on.

It has been almost a month since my last round of chemo. I wore the blue mask for a couple of weeks after the final round of chemo just to make sure I didn’t catch anything. At this point I am very glad I had been doing so. Yesterday I was taken down by a stomach flu bug of some type. The though of having this flu bug while on chemo makes me glad I wore the blue mask!

Actually last Halloween I blogged about my decision to wear the blue mask. At the time I felt the extra precaution of wearing the blue mask was worth attention it drew to me in public. During all six rounds of chemo I was pretty clockwork about using the blue mask and carrying hand sanitizer with me when I ventured out in public. Some chemo patients I’ve spoken with feel the blue mask is worthless. They may be right, but I feel comfortable with my decision to wear the mask. Going through a stomach flu like this during chemo would have been horrible, especially during the last few rounds as chemo got harder on my body.

I know some chemo patients struggle with the decision as to whether the blue mask is necessary. Personally I think it was worthwhile for me to wear the mask, especially since the flu and pertussis (whooping cough) have been going around. Yes I’ve heard some chemo patients say they made it through their treatments with no issues after deciding not to use the mask. But I’ve also heard of chemo patients being hospitalized by things such as the flu virus. In the end though it is up to each person to make their own person risk assessment.

The day after the bone marrow biopsy

Yesterday I posted about my bone marrow biopsy experience. It was a long day and I was happy to be done with the whole thing. Since then I have had many blog readers inquire about how I felt the day after the biopsy. I can happily say the day after went really well and I had no apparent bone pain.

I had feared the bone marrow biopsy would leave me feeling hurt for a long time as the bone heals from being pounded into. In the past I’ve had broken bones that hurt for quite a while as they healed. That fear was unfounded in my case. The area where the needles were injected into me are tender. But I did not feel any actual pain in that area. Really the only pain I felt the day after the procedure was in my lower back; and I think that had more to do with laying in uncomfortable positions during the biopsy procedures.

Removing the bandage was also a non-event. My wife and a nurse had noted a blister under the bandage which could have come open while removing the bandage. This didn’t happen. Actually the blister had gotten much small over course of the night.

The wound site itself looked good as well. With the bandage removed there were two distinct holes. Likely each of the two biopsy procedures had used a different hole. There was a little bit of bruising and swelling around the wound sites, but no pain or signs of infection.

Really the only problem I had the day after biopsy surgery was trying to get all the sticky glue stuff off from the heart monitors. I swear that stuff does not come off for anything. Gorilla glue has nothing on the heart monitor goop!

Since the day after the bone marrow biopsy was such a non-event I’ll end this post here. Actually as I write this post, two days after the biopsy, I’m feeling pretty good. Perhaps I’m ready to possibly get some work done on another chapter of a book that I keep procrastinating on.

Mulimedia Friday

Or maybe instead of getting another chapter done in the book I’ll once again get sidetracked by YouTube. Here is a classic Frampton song to explain how I feel today:

And with everything I’ve been through I can’t help but think I’m very lucky and am very grateful for what I have. Queue Joe Walsh:

And finally I don’t really think I would have gotten through all this without my friends and family.

The bone marrow biopsy experience

Last week I had my after-chemo PET scan done. The hope for that scan was that I would get the news that all the active cancer had been kicked out of my body. Unfortunately there was a spot still lit up on the PET scan. Specifically my left illiac, the upper wing of the pelvis, lit up with possible cancer. Due to this spot my oncologist wanted to do a bone marrow biopsy in orderto find out if this is in fact active cancer, or is something else. In this post I will share my bone marrow biopsy experience.

Just as with any surgery, I started the day by not eating or drinking anything after midnight the night prior. I really didn’t have a problem doing this. The only reason I mention this is because my well-meaning wife decided to skip breakfast as well so she wouldn’t be eating in front of me. This of course made her very hungry later on in the day and I fear her blood sugar may have gotten too low. The stress of my going through this probably didn’t help her disposition either. Hopefully in the future I will be able to talk her into eating breakfast when/if I go through something like this again. Oops, I’m off topic already; back to this post…

The plan

Before the procedure I was able to meet with the oncologist. She explained what would be done. There was actually two possible plans for getting the bone marrow biopsy samples. The first plan was for her to do the procedure and taking a bone marrow biopsy and a bone marrow aspiration. Here is what the Mayo website has to say about these two procedures:

Bone marrow has a fluid portion and a more solid portion. In bone marrow biopsy, your doctor uses a needle to withdraw a sample of the solid portion. In bone marrow aspiration, a needle is used to withdraw a sample of the fluid portion.

My oncologist went on to explain she would be doing this with a needle to punch through the outer layer of the bone in order to get these samples. She would apply a local anesthesia. This procedure was not expected to take very long.

The backup plan

In the event my oncologist was not able to get a sample of bone marrow there was a backup plan. The imaging doctor would be on standby and perform the bone marrow biopsy in the CT scan room. If this were to happen he would also grab a sample of bone along with the two types of bone marrow samples. Spoiler alert, the plan B option does happen. I remember wondering how a procedure could be done by CT scan since there is so little room in the CT machine for me, much less room for someone trying to do a procedure on me. I find out later.

My port worked!

During the last couple rounds of chemo my port only worked in one direction. The port would allow liquid into my body, but would not allow blood to be drawn. A catheter retraction was the root cause of this. When the nurse accessed my port for this procedure she was able to get a good blood draw. It was the hopes of the surgeon that the port catheter would straighten itself out; and it appears that actually happened. Hopefully I won’t have any more port issues going forward! Oops, off topic again…

The first attempt at a bone marrow biopsy

I was wheeled into the procedure room. After getting everything set up and hooking me up to monitoring machines I was told it was time for the procedure. First the oncologist would apply a local anesthesia where she would be performing the biopsy. I was warned this would feel similar to when a dentist applies a local anesthesia with a needle. She is right that the experience is similar feeling, but there was no initial pain like there is when the dentist does it in the mouth. That was one pleasant surprise!

The oncologist then went on to perform the biopsy. I should mention I was laying on my right side with my knees as close to my chest as possible. While this fetal-like position was quite uncomfortable, it gave the oncologist the clearest possible access to my pelvis. The procedure room tech warned me I would feel some “pressure” when the needle was put in. If the pressure became too much, or if that pressure turned into pain, I was told more local anesthesia could be applied. When the oncologist actually put the needle into me I really didn’t feel anything at first. I felt kind of a light and sharp pressure just as I had been warned about. Then the major pressure occurred.

As she was trying to punch through the bone the pressure turned into extreme pain. Of course I didn’t come out and say it like that. Instead I just said “ow, I feel a lot of pressure”. The oncologist backed off and gave me more local anesthesia. She tried two more times to punch through the outer layer of the bone. Each time the pressure/pain got worse. She tried one more time with a different size of needle. This final attempt gave me one of the most extreme pains I remember feeling. Again I didn’t actually come out and say how badly it hurt in plain language. Instead I just loudly said “ow, I am feeling MAJOR pressure!”. At the same time there were tears coming out of the corner of my eyes. The oncologist and tech in the room determined I was actually in a lot of pain from this procedure.

I can’t remember if it was the procedure tech or the oncologist, but one of them mentioned that this procedure is not normally done on someone as young as myself. It felt kind of good being called young at age 45. Normally it is much older patients having a bone marrow biopsy done in this manner. Apparently the outer layer of the bone gets much softer as we get older and much easier to punch through with a needle. The oncologist apologized for the pain she had caused me. All I said was “no worries, it is what it is”.

Looking back I think this procedure must have been pretty bloody. The oncologist apologized to the procedure room tech for the mess she had made and later on my wife saw a lot of blood on me and my gown. This blood had caused my wife quite a bit of anxiety. I think all I said to my wife was something like “no worries, it’s only blood”.

Time to implement Plan B

Sine the original bone marrow biopsy didn’t work, plan B had to implemented. After about a half hour I was wheeled down to the CT scan room. Here I was rolled onto the CT scan table/bed and once again hooked up to machines. During this procedure I had to lay on my stomach the whole time. Looking back I think my only complaint about the plan B is my having to lay on my stomach the whole time. I am a large person and it is very uncomfortable to lay on my stomach for any amount of time, especially for the hour this ended up taking.

Once the staff started taking pictures of the area I was told not to move if at all possible. They especially didn’t want me to move my hip at all. That small instruction became harder as time went on… It seemed to take forever for anything to happen after they took the images. As time when on the pain in my back from being in this position got worse.

After about 20 or 30 minutes the imaging doctor visited me. He apologized for taking so long. The problem they were having is trying to determine just where to take the biopsy sample. The CT scan was not showing any signs of lesions or anything to match up with what the PET scan showed. They had spent the last twenty minutes planning out just where to take the bone marrow sample and the best path to take. At this point I really didn’t care about all these details, I just wanted the whole ordeal done. Looking back I realize I should have been more happy to hear there was no sign of anything in the CT scan, it may be a sign that no active cancer is actually present in my pelvis.

During this procedure the imaging doctor used a local anesthesia as the first procedure had. But he also had me lightly sedated as well. I was not put to sleep, but I was definitely feeling light-headed. When the imaging doctor started the procedure all I felt was a light pressure, there was no pain at all. This was definitely much better than how Plan A went! To ensure the needle was going to the right location the imaging doctor constantly had the tech put me back into the CT machine to take an image. I would then be taken right out and he would continue the procedure. Earlier I had wondered how the doctor could perform a procedure with the in the machine, and I now had that answer. I remember thinking I felt like the bird in the coo-coo clock constantly going in and out of the machine.

At one point I heard the imaging doctor ask for a hammer. Someone in the room then inquired whether he wanted the big or small hammer. The doctor said the small hammer would be sufficient. In retrospect I wondered what the two different hammers looked like. This all happened behind my back so I was unable to see what was going on. It was a weird feeling when the doctor started to use the hammer to break through my bone. It didn’t actually hurt at all. I could just feel a weird vibration going through my bones. And of course I could also hear him hammering. My bones must in much better shape than I though they were since it actually seem to take him a while to break through.

After breaking through the bone I remember going in an out of the CT machine quite a few times. I think this was done so he could get samples in various places within my pelvis. Other than the discomfort from being on my stomach, I don’t remember any pain during this part of the biopsy. After the procedure was done I remember the doctor pressing hard against my back where he had just put a bandage. He told me I had to lay down on my back for three hours before I could go home. At that point I was looking forward to getting off my stomach and was looking forward to laying on my back!

Recovery

Finally I was able to go back to the recovery room. I was so happy to be wheeled back on the bed, since it meant I was once again on my back instead of laying on my stomach. Shortly after arriving my wife was brought into the room. She looked like she had been through more than I had. It is easy to forget that these procedures can be emotionally taxing on loved ones who are waiting what feels like forever as the procedure goes on. And in my case the first procedure had problems and I had to go on to plan B. That whole time she had to sit there wondering what went wrong and why this whole thing was taking so long. I think it took over two and a half hours for me to get through both procedures, an eternity to someone sitting in the waiting room.

Recovery itself went pretty easy. I did eat a small cheeseburger. The nurse offered multiple times to order other food. But honestly eating while laying flat on my back is hard enough and I really didn’t want to eat more until I got out of the hospital. After three hours I was getting kind of tired of being on back, but I just kept in mind this was much better than laying on my back!

When I finally was able to get up the nurse and my wife looked at the dressing. Apparently the area is quite bruised and there is a large blister just under one corner of the bandage. The nurse said to watch that blister when the dressing is removed, as it may come open. There wasn’t a lot of blood in the bandage. But it was apparent to the nurse and my wife that multiple wound sites existed under the bandage.

After getting the normal discharge instructions I was finally free to go. We had been there from 9:30 am to 4:00 pm. A very long day! One I hope not to repeat any time soon.

Now it is time to wait again

During recovery the oncologist had come by to speak with me and apologize for the first procedure not working. I again just said “no worries, it was what it was”. She said it would likely take a week for all the biopsy results to come in and she would see me next Wednesday. The samples would be sent to the lab in Sioux Falls. She also noted some of the samples would go to Mayo Clinic. It was her hope that no active cancer would be found in the samples. It is possible the PET scan showed extra activity in my pelvis because it was recovering from chemo. In researching PET scans I have found it is quite common to get false positives for a variety of reasons. She also reiterated the fact that the PET scan showed no activity in the rest of my body. If this biopsy comes back good I am free of any actual active cancer. Now I just have to wait a week to find out the biopsy results!

No all clear after chemo, bone marrow biopsy tomorrow

Last week I noted I would be going in for my after-chemo PET scan. I wasn’t really worried about this particular scan. The mid-chemo scan showed a lot of progress and I expected to get an all-clear during this scan. It never even occurred to me I would still have something show up in the scan. Well something did and I go in for a bone marrow biopsy tomorrow to find out the details.

On Wednesday of last week I had the PET scan. Just like the previous two PET scans, this one went fine. This one seemed to take longer than the previous two. But then I’m 6’3″, so my PET scan takes longer than people of more average height. When leaving the hospital I put the PET scan out of mind since I was unlikely to see any results from the scan until the next week.

On Thursday morning my oncologist called me right away. She let me know that she had reviewed the scan already and that there was still one area lit up on the PET scan. It was in my pelvis and she wanted to do a bone marrow biopsy in order to determine more about the spot. I agreed this was the right thing to do. She then had her nursing staff cancel my doctors appointment for the following Wednesday and instead setup a surgery appointment. As I write this, the bone marrow biopsy surgery will occur tomorrow.

I wanted to blog about this right away. But each time I sat to blog about this situation I was unsure of how I felt. Part of me was happy that most of my body is clear of active cancer. But after six rounds of R-CHOP chemo I was feeling somewhat disheartened to hear I was not in total remission. The final two rounds of chemo were particularly hard on me. Hearing that I still had active cancer after going through chemo really made me question whether I can actually fight this cancer off. I haven’t given up, but I definitely had a few days of being down.

On Monday (yesterday) my online chart showed the notes from the doctor that reviewed my PET scan. I can’t see the actual scan images until I visit the doctors office, but the notes can at least let me possibly know a little about what is going on. Here is one of the notes from the scan:

2. There is a new hypermetabolic focus in the left iliac bone compared to prior study. This is commonly seen if the patient has had a bone marrow. However, if the patient has not had a bone marrow aspiration in this area further evaluation would be needed.

With the help of google I was able to determine the “iliac” is the top wing of the pelvis. Further on in the notes it also states the previous PET scan showed no activity in this region.

Seeing the doctors notes probably didn’t give me any truly helpful information to process what is going on with my pelvis. But I still am glad I was able to read the notes. Here is the first note listed:

1. No evidence of metabolically active disease noted. The study is similar to prior PET/CT 11/7/2018 consistent with level 2 disease on the 5 point system.

If it hadn’t been for this new spot in my pelvis I think I could have said I was in remission.

Tomorrow I will go in for the bone marrow biopsy. Hopefully this is much to do about nothing. But if this is something, meaning cancer, I guess I’ll just keep moving forward and work with my oncologist to figure out the next treatment plan (as long as it isn’t R-CHOP).

PET Scan and Sleep Study today

Today is a pretty busy day for me medically speaking. This afternoon I will have my third PET scan done. Then overnight I will be at the hospital for a sleep study. I hadn’t really wanted both items on the same day. But the sleep study was order weeks ago and the PET scan can only be done in Aberdeen on Wednesdays.

Back in November I had my second PET scan done. At that point I had completed three rounds of R-CHOP chemotherapy. It appeared at that time that the active cancer had been pushed into remission in my lymphatic system. Only my bones showed active cancer in that scan. Since that time I have completed three more rounds of chemo. The hope now is that no active cancer is present in my bones. Either way though my oncologist decided six rounds of R-CHOP chemo was sufficient. For that I am very thankful. I’m not sure how I would have been able to do the additional two rounds of chemo that was possible.

I won’t be able to see the actual PET scan until next week, when I meet with my oncologist. The notes from the scan will show up in my chart that I can view online. But that really isn’t the same as seeing the actual scan. The first time I had a PET scan done I had a lot of anxiety. This time I am calm and just looking forward to seeing if the chemo worked as expected. I know it is unlikely I will see a major firework show on this scan, so I really don’t see a reason to be nervous. I’ll just have the scan done today and wait until next week to see the actual images. At that time I am also likely to have a bone-marrow biopsy scheduled.

The second medical endeavor today will be a sleep study. This was ordered by a pulmonologist I saw a couple months ago. I have a long history of breathing and sleep issues. When meeting with the pulmonary doctor it was determined I should have a formal sleep study done. I’m not really looking forward to spending the night in the hospital with a bunch of wires hooked up to me. But if they can find something out and help me get some sleep I guess it will be worth it.

I’m not really nervous about either the PET scan or sleep study. Whatever is found (or not found) can be dealt with moving forward. I do however wish both of these didn’t end up being scheduled on the same day. But it is what it is.

The boys have really stepped up

The boys and I this Christmas.

One of my favorite things to be in life is a dad. That is one of the reasons I call this blog Dad Against Cancer. They may not believe it, but almost everything I do is to somehow make their life better. Part of my motivation to kick the cancer out of my body is so I can keep spending time with my boys and the wife. I have a feeling they want to keep me around for a while as well. In this post I will highlight a few ways the boys have stepped up to help me get through chemo.

First and foremost the boys have adjusted their home life to accommodate my needs. The boys wash their hands on a regular basis and use hand sanitizer to ensure I don’t catch a nasty virus when my immune system is low. This may seem like a small thing. But it can sometimes be a pain to get kids to do things like wash hands. The boys now do this without even being told. If they do forget and the wife or I have to remind them, they do it without a huff. Little things like that show they are taking my health serious.

Another thing done by the two younger boys, Lawson and Ashton, is to open doors for me in public. When we go out in public I try to avoid touching doors or anything that a lot of other people may have touched. Yes I do keep hand sanitizer with me, but it is much easier to just avoid touching things when the boys are helping out. In the few times we have gone shopping while I’ve been on chemo, the boys will push the cart and load it up with what I tell them. They even somehow have found a way to do this without fighting or hurting each other with the cart (well mostly, they are boys after all).

Over Christmas break my oldest son really stepped up. He is now back from college and has been transporting his younger brothers to school, basketball practice, band practice, and various other things. These are activities I love to do myself. But the last two rounds of chemo really brought me down physically. Dustin stepping up to cover for me helps more than he will ever know. During all this he also made sure I was fed. I am very proud of that young man!

There are many other things the boys have done to help me out. But I think the above examples show some of what kids of cancer patients have to do. I am dang proud of those three boys and hope to be around for many years so I can meet and be proud of their children some day.

Round six of chemo done, yes I’m still blogging

Last round of R-CHOP chemo done!

It has been a few weeks since I have been able to blog. As I mentioned in my last blog each round of chemo has hit me harder. Round six was no exception to this trend. But I do have good news, I am now done with my R-CHOP chemo! And now that I am past the hump created by my sixth round of chemo I can get back to regular blogging again!

Last week I had my sixth and final round of R-CHOP chemo. The oncologist met with me prior to my round six chemo injection. She had determined based upon the PET scan I had done after round three and other factors that going past six rounds of chemo would not be necessary. I was so happy to hear this news. The fifth round of chemo had really beat me down and the thought of having three more rounds seemed impossible. She did mention however that I would have another PET scan and have to get a bone-marrow biopsy done to ensure the cancer is gone from my bones. If there is still active cancer in my bones she will come up with a plan of action based upon the PET scan and biopsy results. I am more than happy to move on from R-CHOP chemo and possibly on to other treatment options. Although honestly I just hope the R-CHOP kicked the cancer out of my bones and I can just start my two years of maintenance injections.

After the oncologist gave me the good news I had my sixth and final round of R-CHOP chemo. As with the other times receiving chemo I don’t remember much; the Benadryl really did a number on me. Recovery from this round of chemo has been particularly hard on me. For the last week and a half I feel like every part of me has been on the losing side of a boxing match. My energy levels were also at all-time lows. The few times I had to go out and see anyone in public I would use an energy drink and put every bit of energy into seeming normal. Such outings would leave me completely without energy for a day or so. During that time my wonderful boys really stepped up and helped me any way they could. I could not be more proud of them!

Yesterday I finally felt half-way normal. To celebrate I spent the afternoon ice fishing. Again the boys really helped me by getting my stuff out to the ice and helped me bring it back to the house afterwards. I didn’t catch any fish worth keeping, just a dozen or so perch that really weren’t big enough for anything. The lack of catching bigger fish really didn’t bother me though. I was just happy to get out of the house.

Today I feel even better. For the first time in a few weeks I actually feel good enough blog again. I plan to take a trip up north to help move my oldest son. Even though I won’t be much help in actually moving his stuff, I can still drive my pickup to help him out. Hopefully this upward trend can continue! And hopefully I don’t overdo anything; as I really do get tired and wore-out very quickly.

I’ll end this post here. This post was really about getting an update out there about my status. Also I wanted to ensure everyone knew I was still blogging. Actually I have the topics for dozens of blogs ready to go for this year. I just needed to energy to start blogging again. I appreciate the many messages I received during the past few weeks asking if I was OK. It never occurred to me that a lack of blogging by me would even be noticed. Again, thank-you to everyone out there for the support.

Bonus song!

Now that I’m feeling better I can’t get this classic from Robert Earl Keen out of my head.

Each round of chemo gets harder on the body

Last week I had round five of chemo. My blogging has been somewhat lacking since receiving my latest round of infusion drugs. Partly this has been due to my being busy with other projects. But honestly a bigger reason is because I feel just plain beat down. Each round of chemo seems to get harder on the body.

Overall I really can’t complain about the side-effects I’ve had while on chemo. The main side-effects I experience are brain fog, insomnia, and bone pain. I don’t experience debilitating nausea like some on chemo experience. But I have noticed over the last few rounds of chemo that each time I just feel more run down. Of course the lack of sleep may have a lot to do with this run-down feeling.

Over the last few days I’ve been reading the experiences of a lot of cancer patients, especially for those on the chemo regiment I am taking (R-CHOP). I can’t help but think of Forrest Gump when reading through these stories. I can hear him saying something like “Chemo is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’ll get.” With so many possible side-effects it almost seems that each persons experience with chemo is truly unique. Plus many people on chemo, including myself, appear to have their chemo experience change each round. In my case it appears to get worse each time. But other chemo patients appear to have fewer side-effects with each round.

Today, a week after my latest round of chemo, I actually feel pretty good. It does make me wonder what round six of chemo will be like for me in two weeks. Theoretically that could be my last round of chemo, which at this point I wonder how worn down I will feel after that round. I guess I’ll find out in two weeks.