The MRI went OK but seemed long

A couple of weeks ago, I posted about speaking with my MRI results with a neurologist. Since that post, I’ve had a few followers of the blog ask if I could document how the actual MRI of my head went. I can understand why they are requesting it. Going into a new type of scan can cause scanxiety. In this post, I will document what happened on the day of the MRI.

No prescan requirements

It seems a lot of procedures we cancer patients go through have conditions to meet. Most typically, we might be required to fast or refrain from eating sugary foods. For the MRI, there were no dietary restrictions given. The only restriction given to me was to refrain from wearing any clothing with metal in it. That was simple enough of a requirement to meet.

Filling out the paperwork

After being brought back to the scan area, I had to fill out a piece of paper. From what I remember, this was confirming my history with scans, medications, and anything metal in my body. At the time, I still had the port in my chest, so I think that was the only thing I had to note on that paperwork. 

Removing all metal

I was then put in a changing room with lockers and asked to remove any metal. That day I wore sweats, a hoodie, and flip flops (which I wear year-round). None of these items had metal in them. Those who do wear clothing with metal would have to take them off and wear a hospital gown. I didn’t want to wear a hospital gown, hence why I made sure I wore no metal. In my case, the only metal I had to take off was my glasses and the dental flipper device in my mouth.

Prescan conversation with tech

Before getting into the MRI, the tech let me know how the procedure would go. She said I would have to lay perfectly still the whole time for them to get a sharp image. About halfway through the process, she said I would get an injection of contrast via a needle. I was thrilled to hear a needle would be used to administer the contrast. I remember a previous scan (I believe it was a CT) where the contrast had to be taken orally, and I didn’t enjoy that at all!

She also said the machine would be very loud. This noise, she said, is caused by the magnets inside the machine. I was given a pair of earbuds and asked what kind of music I wanted to listen to (classic rock). Then she laid me back, and I was brought into the machine.

The first half of the scan

Actually, there isn’t much to report about the scan itself. I am not claustrophobic, so being inside a small tube didn’t bother me. I could, however, definitely see where someone afraid of small spaces would hate having an MRI done.

Even though the tech had warned me about the loud noises made by the MRI, I wasn’t adequately prepared for just how loud it would be. The MRI creates a large variety of sounds as it goes through its cycles. Some of the noises are so loud I could almost feel my eardrums being pounded. It is a wonder I didn’t come out of the MRI with a massive headache.

I believe the first part of the scan took about twenty minutes. Other than the loud noises, there isn’t much to report. It’s just a matter of laying still. Once in a while, the tech would say something through the headphones, I don’t remember much of what she said.

The second half of the scan

Upon completion of the first half of the scan, I heard the tech tell me I would be brought out of the machine for the contrast. She still wanted me to stay still during this process, or at least keep my head still. After injecting me with the contrast, she stuck me right back in the machine.

I think the second half of the scan took about the same amount of time as the first half. Part of me remembers hearing the tech say this part was shorter. But it didn’t seem shorter to me. By this time, my joints were starting to get sore from not being moved. I’m a person that has restless leg, and honestly, it takes a lot for me to keep still for twenty minutes at a time.

But I got through the second half of the scan OK. After the tech moved the bed out of the machine, she helped me slowly sit up. After a minute or two, she then helped me to stand. She explained this had to be done slowly because people will often fall after getting done with these scans. Falling is especially frequent if people try to stand right away.

I had to wait around for just a few minutes while someone verified the images were adequate. After getting the word, I was released and went off to the waiting room to let my wife know we could get out of there.

It was just a scan

A lot of people going into various types of scans often get scanxiety. Of course, a lot of that scanxiety is caused by worrying about the scan results. But after speaking with enough people, I’ve found many people (including myself at various times in the past) get a fair amount of anxiety about the scan itself. Hopefully, by sharing how my MRI experience went, it will help others relieve any scanxiety they have about getting an MRI.

Song of the day: Basket Case

I believe I have featured this song before as song of the day. I just can’t help but think of this song when talking about scanxiety. I was never a huge Green Day fan, but this is a good track.

Bonus Song: Everlong

Since I’m in a 90’s alt rock mood I might as well bring out this great track from the Foo Fighters. The scan seemed to take forever in the second half, which brought this great track to mind.

My visit with the neurologist for memory issues

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned the doctor had halted my regularly scheduled maintenance infusion of Rituximab. This temporary halt was so my short-term memory issues could to further diagnosed. The oncology staff set me up with an MRI appointment followed by a visit with a neurologist. In this post, I will discuss how the meeting with the neurologist went. I will note this post is only going to focus on the brain part of my visit with the oncologist. In a future post, I will relay other conversations I had with the neurologist.  

Feeling this was a waste of time going in.

Going into this appointment, I had this feeling that I was wasting the time of the neurologist. I already had my MRI completed a week prior. The oncology nursing staff notified me that nothing worrisome was present in the scan. That was great news. There was no sign of cancer or other abnormalities which could be causing my memory loss. At this point, I figured my short term memory loss was a side effect of the Rituximab infusions I’ve been taking every eight weeks.

The appointment was worth it!

I was wrong about the appointment being a waste of the neurologist’s time. The neurologist seemed glad I came to see him. I found the meeting to be very valuable to me. I’ve got to remind myself that sometimes doctors refer me to specialists for a reason. In these situations, I tend to get stuck in the mind-frame that people more deserving of treatment need to see these specialty doctors before I do. But in reality, I have more than enough medical issues that I should be thankful to get such excellent medical service in all areas.

Results of my MRI.

First, the neurologist went over my MRI results. As noted earlier in this post, there was nothing worrisome in the scan that would explain my memory loss issues. But there was mention of a small bony area in my skull, which looked odd (my words). This bone variation had been noted on a prior CT scan and has not appeared to change since then. The neurologist stated this doesn’t seem to be anything worth worrying about at the moment. But long term, he wants to ensure this area does not grow.

Verifying my symptoms.

Before meeting with the neurologist, a couple of grad students asked me a lot of questions. The students also led me through a series of logic tests. The doctor let me know my analytical skills seems to be quite sharp. I related my experience with brain fog during chemo and how I fought the fog with logic games. Since being off chemo, the brain fog slowly lifted over time. That is except for short-term memory loss. 

He also noted that I seemed to be handling myself very well, both mentally and emotionally. I did relate the bit of depression I had earlier this year. But since then, I have been excellent and looking forward to each day. Since getting past that bit of depression, I don’t seem to have had many brain fog related symptoms other than short-term memory loss.

Finally, the neurologist had me walk through my short-term memory loss symptoms. I let him know it was other people that were informing me about the memory loss. I would have the same conversation just minutes apart and have no recollection of the earlier conversation. I also related how I used a webcam to verify my dog was taking advantage of my memory problems

So far, I haven’t had problems remembering what I’m doing while driving or have feelings of being completely lost. I forget conversations and such in the short-term. Being unable to know if I’ve had a conversation before, has also caused me to avoid public situations around other people. It doesn’t seem consistent and seems worse the few weeks following maintenance treatment. Well, at least family members tell me its worse at those times.

The neurologist thinks this is a side-effect of the infusions or chemo.

At the end of the appointment, the neurologist let me know he believes I am suffering a side-effect from the drugs taken. Likely it is a side-effect from the Rituximab, although it was possibly still a side-effect from chemo a year ago. The fact the memory issues seem to coincide with my maintenance treatments seem to back up that theory. But he also noted it is excellent the other brain fog related items I had during chemo are absent.

I will follow up with him in four months.

I went into this appointment, thinking I was going to waste the neurologist’s time. Not only did I appear not to waste his time, but he also wants to meet with me again in four months to see how I’ve progressed. He informed my oncologist of his findings and recommended I go back on maintenance right away. I agreed with him that this one possible side-effect is not reason enough to stop maintenance. I only have about a year left of maintenance anyhow, and I want to stay in remission as long as possible!

PS. I did start maintenance infusions the very next day after this appointment. My oncologist wasted no time.

PPS. In a future post, I will briefly discuss other things the neurologist was able to explain about me that had nothing to do with the MRI or memory loss.

Song of the day: Feeling Good Again

I’ve shared this classic Robert Earl Keen song a few times. Leaving the appointment with the neurologist I was feeling pretty good. I couldn’t help but think about this song!

Bonus Song: Brain Damage

Before getting the MRI results, I had this classic Pink Floyd song going through my head occasionally. I kept wondering if maybe there was something wrong with my brain.

Getting an MRI for memory loss

Yesterday I was supposed to have my latest maintenance infusion of Rituxan (Rituximab). That did not happen after consulting with the oncology CNP and oncologist. My memory issues have not improved, and they decided to schedule an MRI for me instead. In this post, I will briefly discuss my memory loss and upcoming MRI.

Memory loss is not improving.

I’ve noticed memory loss issues for quite a while now. Over a year ago, I mentioned it in my post about brain fog (chemo brain). Since that time, my short-term memory problems have not improved. I think they have become worse. It has gotten to the point where my kids don’t even like to tell me about anything coming up because they figure I will forget it anyhow. 

My memory loss has also become one of the reasons I try to avoid too many people. It gets frustrating trying to talk to people with the knowledge that I might be forgetting conversations from earlier. I’ve turned in to the person that repeats the same story over and over again. Even worse, I’ve become the person that can’t be trusted to remember anything. It gets quite frustrating.

Nothing seems to work for improving memory loss.

I’ve noted before that playing logic games helps out with the thinking portion of brain fog. Sometimes the fog is so thick I can’t write a single blog post. But after playing logic and brain games for a little while, the mist will open up enough for me to think straight. As far as I can tell, playing games does not help with my memory loss. I’ve also tried memory and other brain games. Nothing seems to work. 

Of course, part of the problem is I don’t know just how often I am suffering from memory loss. There are times where friends or family members will bring it to my attention. And of course, there are times I am sitting somewhere trying to remember what I was going to do. But I can’t help but wonder how often I am experiencing short-term memory loss and don’t realize. How am I supposed to know I forgot something if I don’t remember there was something to forget?

I am getting an MRI of the brain.

When I had my consult with the oncology CNP yesterday, I brought this up. My wife was there back up what I was telling the CNP. I think my wife is even more worried about my memory issues than I am. It can’t be easy for her to be married to someone going through memory issues.

The CNP and oncologist met about my memory loss and decided against having me take my Rituxan infusion. Instead, I would be scheduled for an MRI of the brain. They want to try to narrow down what is causing the memory loss. This short-term memory loss could still be part of my brain fog from going through chemo last year. It could also be a side-effect of the Rituximab.

There are other possibilities unrelated to chemo that could be causing my memory loss. It is possible cancer has spread into my brain and is causing issues. I doubt this is the issue, but it is a possibility. There are also possibilities I can’t think of, which an MRI may be able to spot. I believe the main reason I’m getting an MRI is to make sure these other possibilities are not causing my memory loss.

MRI on Monday

My MRI is scheduled for Monday morning. Some date after that I will have an appointment with a neurologist as well. I’m not nervous about either appointment. Personally, I think my short-term memory loss is still a side effect of the brain fog caused by chemo. But I have researched enough cancer stories now to know that there are other possibilities, and I suppose it isn’t a bad thing getting more information about my brain health.

PS. I also found out I will be taking my port out. But that is a post for another day.

Song of the Day – Let’s Make a Memory

Talking about memories brings this classic Roy Orbison song to mind.

Bonus Song: Check My Brain

The bonus song is a little harder rock than I usually post on this page. I can’t help but think of this Alice in Chains song when thinking about going through a brain scan.