Finding out about my neuropathy from the neurologist

Last week I posted about my visit with a neurologist about my memory issues. In that post, I focused purely upon the diagnostics and discussions revolving around my memory issues. For this post, I will blog about a few other topics I discussed with the neurologist. 

Neuropathy in my legs!

The biggest shock for me during the neurologist meeting was to discover I have peripheral neuropathy. After a series of questions, the neurologist took a small needle out of his jacket. He then proceeded to prick my skin by the ankle. I could not feel the needle at all. He continued to keep piercing my skin every couple inches, going towards my knee. When he reached just a few inches below my knee, I finally began to feel the needle sticking into my skin.

The fact I couldn’t feel those needle pricks came as somewhat of a surprise to me. I thought neuropathy meant I would feel lousy pain all the time. Apparently, there are different symptoms that people can have from peripheral neuropathy. Looking back, I do recall having a buzzing/tingly feeling in my feet and lower legs, but I never really thought much about it. Additionally, I do get what I assumed was charlie horse feelings in my feet, which I now wonder if it has been neuropathy.

After the needle, the doctor checked reflexes in my legs. I was surprised to find I had little or no reflexes in various parts of my lower leg. In particular, my ankle appears to have almost no reflexes. Again, looking back, I probably should have known something was wrong. I do seem to have problems standing still. Sometimes when standing, my ankles will almost seem to give out. Other times when taking stairs, my foot won’t always be in the position I would expect it to be. These odd symptoms appear to be part of the neuropathy.

The neurologist believes the neuropathy is a side-effect of the chemo regiment I went through. In particular, he thinks the neuropathy is a direct result of my infusions of Vincristine (Oncovin), the O part of the R-CHOP chemotherapy I was on. Right now, the doctor doesn’t want to do anything with the neuropathy. We will monitor and go from there if my neuropathy gets worse or doesn’t improve. 

Shaking hands

For as long as I can remember, my hands have shaken. It usually isn’t a large shake. It’s somewhat similar to the involuntary shiver someone gets when it is a little bit cold. While this has made doing things such as soldering and painting slightly tricky at times, it hasn’t impacted my life very much. Plus, it doesn’t seem to have gotten any worse or better over the years. My shaking hands seem to be a regular part of me.

My shaking hands is a part of the conversation with the neurologist I should have taken notes on. He gave me an excellent explanation as to why this happens. The neurologist also let me know there is no need to worry. Finally, he gave me a ten-dollar name for the condition. Since it was nothing to worry about, I didn’t pay enough attention to what he called it so I could remember it now. But it was good to know my shaking hands’ condition is not likely to be related to any deeper medical issues.

Bone abnormality in my head

Before seeing the neurologist, I had an MRI of my head performed. The MRI notes included mention of a small irregularity on a bone in my head. Since I was able to speak with a neurologist, I thought this was the perfect time to ask what this abnormality was. At this time, the doctor says this doesn’t appear to be anything to lose sleep over. The anomaly was present in a prior PET and CT scans. The neurologist noted this abnormality doesn’t seem to have changed between scans. My future remission scans will let us know if there are any changes in the state of that abnormality. But at this time, he does not believe it is something to cause concern.

Back to see the neurologist in four months

As I noted in my prior post, I will see the neurologist again in four months. Mostly he will be following up on my memory issues. But he also wants to ensure my neuropathy has not gotten worse. Additionally, by then, I will have had another CT scan. He wants to ensure the bone abnormality has not changed. I hope that this future appointment will be quick and boring.

PS. On a side note, I have the equipment I need for my upcoming podcast. I am very much looking forward to adding a podcast to this site!

Song of the day: Rockit

Today’s song of the day falls very much outside of my typical music. But this 80’s song from Herbie Hancock has some impressive animatronics that reminds me of my lower legs and ankles. With no feeling, it almost seems like my lower legs have become animatronics just like in this video.

Bonus song: Sirius – Eye In The Sky

Since I started with 80’s songs outside of my usual taste, I thought this classic track from Alan Parsons would be worth including. This song has nothing to do with today’s post, but I like this live version of the song and thought others might as well.

My visit with the neurologist for memory issues

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned the doctor had halted my regularly scheduled maintenance infusion of Rituximab. This temporary halt was so my short-term memory issues could to further diagnosed. The oncology staff set me up with an MRI appointment followed by a visit with a neurologist. In this post, I will discuss how the meeting with the neurologist went. I will note this post is only going to focus on the brain part of my visit with the oncologist. In a future post, I will relay other conversations I had with the neurologist.  

Feeling this was a waste of time going in.

Going into this appointment, I had this feeling that I was wasting the time of the neurologist. I already had my MRI completed a week prior. The oncology nursing staff notified me that nothing worrisome was present in the scan. That was great news. There was no sign of cancer or other abnormalities which could be causing my memory loss. At this point, I figured my short term memory loss was a side effect of the Rituximab infusions I’ve been taking every eight weeks.

The appointment was worth it!

I was wrong about the appointment being a waste of the neurologist’s time. The neurologist seemed glad I came to see him. I found the meeting to be very valuable to me. I’ve got to remind myself that sometimes doctors refer me to specialists for a reason. In these situations, I tend to get stuck in the mind-frame that people more deserving of treatment need to see these specialty doctors before I do. But in reality, I have more than enough medical issues that I should be thankful to get such excellent medical service in all areas.

Results of my MRI.

First, the neurologist went over my MRI results. As noted earlier in this post, there was nothing worrisome in the scan that would explain my memory loss issues. But there was mention of a small bony area in my skull, which looked odd (my words). This bone variation had been noted on a prior CT scan and has not appeared to change since then. The neurologist stated this doesn’t seem to be anything worth worrying about at the moment. But long term, he wants to ensure this area does not grow.

Verifying my symptoms.

Before meeting with the neurologist, a couple of grad students asked me a lot of questions. The students also led me through a series of logic tests. The doctor let me know my analytical skills seems to be quite sharp. I related my experience with brain fog during chemo and how I fought the fog with logic games. Since being off chemo, the brain fog slowly lifted over time. That is except for short-term memory loss. 

He also noted that I seemed to be handling myself very well, both mentally and emotionally. I did relate the bit of depression I had earlier this year. But since then, I have been excellent and looking forward to each day. Since getting past that bit of depression, I don’t seem to have had many brain fog related symptoms other than short-term memory loss.

Finally, the neurologist had me walk through my short-term memory loss symptoms. I let him know it was other people that were informing me about the memory loss. I would have the same conversation just minutes apart and have no recollection of the earlier conversation. I also related how I used a webcam to verify my dog was taking advantage of my memory problems

So far, I haven’t had problems remembering what I’m doing while driving or have feelings of being completely lost. I forget conversations and such in the short-term. Being unable to know if I’ve had a conversation before, has also caused me to avoid public situations around other people. It doesn’t seem consistent and seems worse the few weeks following maintenance treatment. Well, at least family members tell me its worse at those times.

The neurologist thinks this is a side-effect of the infusions or chemo.

At the end of the appointment, the neurologist let me know he believes I am suffering a side-effect from the drugs taken. Likely it is a side-effect from the Rituximab, although it was possibly still a side-effect from chemo a year ago. The fact the memory issues seem to coincide with my maintenance treatments seem to back up that theory. But he also noted it is excellent the other brain fog related items I had during chemo are absent.

I will follow up with him in four months.

I went into this appointment, thinking I was going to waste the neurologist’s time. Not only did I appear not to waste his time, but he also wants to meet with me again in four months to see how I’ve progressed. He informed my oncologist of his findings and recommended I go back on maintenance right away. I agreed with him that this one possible side-effect is not reason enough to stop maintenance. I only have about a year left of maintenance anyhow, and I want to stay in remission as long as possible!

PS. I did start maintenance infusions the very next day after this appointment. My oncologist wasted no time.

PPS. In a future post, I will briefly discuss other things the neurologist was able to explain about me that had nothing to do with the MRI or memory loss.

Song of the day: Feeling Good Again

I’ve shared this classic Robert Earl Keen song a few times. Leaving the appointment with the neurologist I was feeling pretty good. I couldn’t help but think about this song!

Bonus Song: Brain Damage

Before getting the MRI results, I had this classic Pink Floyd song going through my head occasionally. I kept wondering if maybe there was something wrong with my brain.