Dealing with constant tests and procedures

Some days I feel like a pincushion.

One aspect of having cancer is dealing with constant tests and procedures. Even being in remission does not seem to slow down the constant scans, blood draws, and incisions. Actually if anything it appears to be worse after chemo has stopped. In this post I will briefly share my experience dealing with the constant tests and procedures.

It seems the doctors constant want to scan or poke me

Prior to getting cancer I would rarely go to the doctor. Like many people I really don’t like going to the doctor unless I really need to. People like me tend to get somewhat overwhelmed once we have cancer and have to make constant trips to the hospital and clinic.

During chemo I was obviously at the hospital a lot. But even after chemo was completed I have had a lot of visits to the clinic to have scans or be poked. Below is a list of visits to the hospital and clinics I’ve had over the last six months since completing my chemo. Each of these visits was for a scan or to be poked.

  • PET scan to ensure I was in remission
  • Bone marrow biopsy
  • Second bone marrow biopsy due to the first one not working
  • X-Ray of chest due to breathing issues
  • X-Ray of neck/chest to see why port was not working
  • Ultrasound of neck to check on growth on neck
  • Biopsy of neck to check growth on neck
  • X-Ray of teeth due to abscessed tooth
  • Extraction of two teeth
  • Overnight sleep study at hospital
  • Second overnight sleep study at hospital
  • X-Ray of chest again for breathing problems
  • Ultrasound of lump on shoulder
  • Removal of large lump on shoulder
  • Removal of stitches from shoulder surgery
  • CT scan of chest and CT scan of abdomen to ensure I’m still in remission

The above list is the test and procedures I can remember off the top of my head (my hospital chart app won’t let me log in right now to see what ones I’m forgetting). It does not include the many doctor visits dealing with those tests and procedures. The list is also missing the maintenance infusions I receive every eight weeks (today happens to be another maintenance infusion day).

Not wanting to tell the doctor when something new comes up

All of these scans, tests, and procedures tend to get overwhelming. It has gotten to the point where I become very apprehensive about mentioning any new symptoms or issues I am having. I’ve spoken to many cancer patients who feel the same way. Just one little comment or question seems to lead to a new scan or procedure.

It’s not that I don’t understand that these scans and procedures are important. I really do. But nonetheless they do become overwhelming. It feels as if I spend more time at the clinic and hospital than I do spending time with my kids.

Stress added to family

It is not only me who feels additional stress from these constant tests and procedures. This spring my wife had a heart attack for the second year in a row. There are many factors in her hear condition, and stress is obviously one of those factors. Having to bring her husband to constant tests and procedures increases the stress upon her. Then of course there is the stress she feels waiting for the results of each test. I would say it is probably even more stressful for her than it is for myself.

My kids also have additional stress added to their lives with these constant tests. The boys try to hide any worry they have. Yet I have noticed they get more clingy and attentive after I’ve had procedures done. As a parent I can tell they are worried and trying their best to help me. I truly feel bad about putting so much stress on my boys, especially the younger ones.

Things likely won’t change

As I conclude this short post, I can’t help but feel things will not change going forward. I’ve spoken to many patients who have lymphoma spread throughout their body and bones like I have. For many of them the constant tests and procedures never slow down once remission has been reached. A large part of me feels I will be one of those patients that will constantly be visiting doctors until the day I die.

Don’t get me wrong though! I am very happy to be alive and will do what I need in order to remain alive. But that doesn’t change the fact that the constant scans and procedures are wearing me down.

Today’s Song: I don’t need no doctor!

For today’s song I go back to a classic track from Humble Pie. This song often goes through my head when I get tired of the constant scans and procedures. The song also reminds me of how much I really just want to be with my wife.

Bonus Track: Under the Blade

Today’s bonus track goes back to the 80’s with a song from the hair metal band Twisted Sister. This song is a bit heavier in style than what I normally share on this site. But the song has to do with dealing the anxiety of going into surgery (and not about suicide as it had been wrongly accused of back in the day).

No all clear after chemo, bone marrow biopsy tomorrow

Last week I noted I would be going in for my after-chemo PET scan. I wasn’t really worried about this particular scan. The mid-chemo scan showed a lot of progress and I expected to get an all-clear during this scan. It never even occurred to me I would still have something show up in the scan. Well something did and I go in for a bone marrow biopsy tomorrow to find out the details.

On Wednesday of last week I had the PET scan. Just like the previous two PET scans, this one went fine. This one seemed to take longer than the previous two. But then I’m 6’3″, so my PET scan takes longer than people of more average height. When leaving the hospital I put the PET scan out of mind since I was unlikely to see any results from the scan until the next week.

On Thursday morning my oncologist called me right away. She let me know that she had reviewed the scan already and that there was still one area lit up on the PET scan. It was in my pelvis and she wanted to do a bone marrow biopsy in order to determine more about the spot. I agreed this was the right thing to do. She then had her nursing staff cancel my doctors appointment for the following Wednesday and instead setup a surgery appointment. As I write this, the bone marrow biopsy surgery will occur tomorrow.

I wanted to blog about this right away. But each time I sat to blog about this situation I was unsure of how I felt. Part of me was happy that most of my body is clear of active cancer. But after six rounds of R-CHOP chemo I was feeling somewhat disheartened to hear I was not in total remission. The final two rounds of chemo were particularly hard on me. Hearing that I still had active cancer after going through chemo really made me question whether I can actually fight this cancer off. I haven’t given up, but I definitely had a few days of being down.

On Monday (yesterday) my online chart showed the notes from the doctor that reviewed my PET scan. I can’t see the actual scan images until I visit the doctors office, but the notes can at least let me possibly know a little about what is going on. Here is one of the notes from the scan:

2. There is a new hypermetabolic focus in the left iliac bone compared to prior study. This is commonly seen if the patient has had a bone marrow. However, if the patient has not had a bone marrow aspiration in this area further evaluation would be needed.

With the help of google I was able to determine the “iliac” is the top wing of the pelvis. Further on in the notes it also states the previous PET scan showed no activity in this region.

Seeing the doctors notes probably didn’t give me any truly helpful information to process what is going on with my pelvis. But I still am glad I was able to read the notes. Here is the first note listed:

1. No evidence of metabolically active disease noted. The study is similar to prior PET/CT 11/7/2018 consistent with level 2 disease on the 5 point system.

If it hadn’t been for this new spot in my pelvis I think I could have said I was in remission.

Tomorrow I will go in for the bone marrow biopsy. Hopefully this is much to do about nothing. But if this is something, meaning cancer, I guess I’ll just keep moving forward and work with my oncologist to figure out the next treatment plan (as long as it isn’t R-CHOP).

PET Scan and Sleep Study today

Today is a pretty busy day for me medically speaking. This afternoon I will have my third PET scan done. Then overnight I will be at the hospital for a sleep study. I hadn’t really wanted both items on the same day. But the sleep study was order weeks ago and the PET scan can only be done in Aberdeen on Wednesdays.

Back in November I had my second PET scan done. At that point I had completed three rounds of R-CHOP chemotherapy. It appeared at that time that the active cancer had been pushed into remission in my lymphatic system. Only my bones showed active cancer in that scan. Since that time I have completed three more rounds of chemo. The hope now is that no active cancer is present in my bones. Either way though my oncologist decided six rounds of R-CHOP chemo was sufficient. For that I am very thankful. I’m not sure how I would have been able to do the additional two rounds of chemo that was possible.

I won’t be able to see the actual PET scan until next week, when I meet with my oncologist. The notes from the scan will show up in my chart that I can view online. But that really isn’t the same as seeing the actual scan. The first time I had a PET scan done I had a lot of anxiety. This time I am calm and just looking forward to seeing if the chemo worked as expected. I know it is unlikely I will see a major firework show on this scan, so I really don’t see a reason to be nervous. I’ll just have the scan done today and wait until next week to see the actual images. At that time I am also likely to have a bone-marrow biopsy scheduled.

The second medical endeavor today will be a sleep study. This was ordered by a pulmonologist I saw a couple months ago. I have a long history of breathing and sleep issues. When meeting with the pulmonary doctor it was determined I should have a formal sleep study done. I’m not really looking forward to spending the night in the hospital with a bunch of wires hooked up to me. But if they can find something out and help me get some sleep I guess it will be worth it.

I’m not really nervous about either the PET scan or sleep study. Whatever is found (or not found) can be dealt with moving forward. I do however wish both of these didn’t end up being scheduled on the same day. But it is what it is.

Multimedia Friday: the PET scan

Earlier this week I mentioned being able to see my second PET scan result. This is a scan that not many people know a lot about, including myself before I first had to get a PET scan. So for this weeks multimedia Friday post I thought it would be worthwhile to share a couple of videos about the PET scan.

Up first is a video explaining the basics of how a PET scan works. This video is just over five minutes long.

Up next is a video of someone showing their PET scan results. I like this video because it shows the “slices” of the body in the same way my oncologist shows me the scan results.  The video also includes white spots similar to the cancer in my scans taken. This video is just under 8 minutes long, but only about the first four minutes are looking at the PET images. The author of this video does not allow it to be streamed from other websites. But if you hit play on the video you can simply click on “watch this video on YouTube”.

Finally I want to share this video explaining the difference between MRI scans, PET scans, and CAT scans. I found it to be interesting. The video is five minutes long.

Bonus Music Video

Up first is kind of a silly song from comedian Dana Carvey. But I couldn’t get this song out of my head earlier this week when writing about R-CHOP, the chemo regiment I am on. Even now in the back of my head I’m singing the lyrics “Ima chopping broccoli!”

For the metal fans we have System of A Down with their song Chop Suey. Not only does this song include the word chop, but in many ways it probably is relevant for too many cancer patients.

The second PET scan looked good!

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Kicking the cancer into remission means being able to spend more time with my boys and I am better able to take care of Ashton on the days he cannot walk!

Last Wednesday I had my second PET scan done to see how well my first three rounds chemo has been working at pushing the lymphoma back. Friday of last week I posted about the scanxiety of waiting for those results. Luckily over the weekend the notes about the scan had been released and it appeared to be good news. Yesterday during my scheduled round of chemo I had an appointment with my oncologist so I could actually see the scan images and get her take on the scan notes. Overall I will say it is great news!

 

The original PET scan reminded me of a fireworks display show. This scan looked nothing like that. Previously I had what appeared to be dozens of lymph nodes from neck to groin lit up with cancerous activity. This time there were no lymph nodes showing any activity. In the first scan my spleen was very over-sized and most of was showing cancerous activity. This time my spleen was almost down to a normal size and showed no cancerous activity. One of my lungs showed quite a bit of cancerous activity. With this scan there was no presence of cancerous activity. I was ecstatic to see this dramatic change.

The cancerous activity was not all gone. My bones still show activity in them. But that cancerous activity is greatly diminished from what it was. The oncologist says it is normal for the bones to take longer. She did say she is happy with the progress made on the bones, even if it is not as far along to being in remission as the rest of the cancer is. I guess bones take a lot longer to heal.

In the notes from the imagine expert it was noted that I have sinusitis. I was given a Z-Pack prescription to take care of this. Despite my best efforts to keep germs and bacteria away, I must have picked up a cold from somewhere. Luckily it isn’t anything too serious. I actually already figured I had something going on with my sinuses for the last week or two due to a stuffed/runny nose and coughing. But part of me thought it was just a side-effect from a chemo drug or fall allergies. Actually I wonder if fall allergies lowered my immune system even lower so I was able to catch some sort of cold.

I just finished my fourth round of chemo today. After six rounds I will have another PET scan done to see if I can stop there or have to go the full eight rounds. I am really hoping I only have to do six rounds. This chemo stuff is very hard on the body and mind. If things go right my final round of chemo will fall on the day after Christmas. That should make for a happy holiday season.

PS. You may have noticed I said I spoke with my Oncologist on the day I was scheduled to have chemo. My chemo was postponed a day due to the hood used by the pharmacist while mixing chemo was broke down on Tuesday for a time. It was repaired and I did chemo today (Wednesday) with no problems. I don’t blame the pharmacist for not wanting to mix chemo chemicals without proper ventilation, this stuff is very toxic!

PET Scan results posted and they look good

Doctor thinks the computerLast Friday I posted about my scanxiety related to waiting for my PET scan results. Originally I thought the wait to see the results would last until Tuesday (tomorrow) when I see my oncologist prior to chemotherapy. Luckily though I was able to see the results of my scan this weekend as they were released to my chart. After reading the results I can say that I am very happy with my response to chemo.

Here is part of what was posted in the lab results part of my online chart:

IMPRESSION:
1. Compared to prior PET/CT 9/5/2018 widespread nodal involvement above and below the diaphragm, splenic and widespread skeletal involvement in the axial and proximal appendicular skeleton have regressed in size and metabolic activity is now normal. This is consistent with a complete metabolic response to therapy. Previously the patient had level 5 disease on the 5 point system and this is returned to level 2 disease of the 5 point system

I put a few sections above in bold lettering. If I am reading this correctly it means I have been responding very well to chemo. It was such a relief to read this. The thought of not responding to chemo and having to start over with a new chemotherapy regiment with a whole different possible set of side-effects was stressing me out. Actually part of me hopes this means I won’t have to do all eight rounds of chemo. Currently I am scheduled to have six to eight rounds of chemo. I’m hoping my response to chemo means I will be able to stop at six rounds. But that will be up to the doctor to determine. Either way I’m happy with what I read.

There are still some trouble areas in my report. But the main area of concern was noted by the imaging doctor as “likely benign”. Also I seem to have developed sinusitis since my last PET scan. I’ll talk to my oncologist about these results tomorrow and see if there is anything that has to be done. Right now I really can’t say I’m worried about them at all.

I am also looking forward to actually seeing my whole scan tomorrow. The online chart does not give me access to see the scan, only the results of the doctor that reviewed the scan. The first scan reminded me of a large fireworks display, hopefully this time it looks more like kiddie fireworks. Plus I know it will relieve a lot of stress from my wife if she is able to see the cancer receding.

Tomorrow I have round four of chemo. I’ll probably do a post prior to my doctor appointment and receiving chemo because I am usually to tired to do any post afterwards (that shot of Benadryl really puts you under). That means it will likely be Wednesday or Thursday before I post about seeing my actual PET scan. Hopefully it looks as good as I think it will!

Waiting for the results of the second PET scan

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The PET scan machine I was in looks similar to this, but has a much longer tube the body goes into.

On Wednesday of this week I had my second PET scan done. I didn’t blog about it at the time because I was feeling somewhat under the weather due to fall allergies. In this post I will share how this experience went and some of the scanxiety this has caused me.

My first PET scan was done about two months ago. At the time I just got my biopsy result and found out for sure I had cancer. Leading up to that first PET scan I had a lot of anxiety, also known as scanxiety. This time I don’t recall having any scanxiety prior to the PET scan, but now that I have to wait for the results I definitely am being impacted by scanxiety.

Before going into the scanxiety let me back up and share my PET scan experience this time. Two days leading up to the PET scan I was on a high protein diet. About 45 minutes prior to the scan I was injected with a glucose solution that contains radioactive material. It is because of this radioactive material that most people will not want to have a PET scan done unless absolutely necessary. Interesting side-note. The tech said the actual injection solution was made down south (I believe in Omaha) and is shipped to Sioux Falls. In Sioux Falls the solution is put into the doses needed for that day and couriered to where it is needed, in this case three hours away in Aberdeen. I believe he said the half-life of the radiation in the solution is 110 minutes. This solution travels quite a bit just to be used in these PET scans. Oops, time to get back on track and focus on the PET scan.

I was on the PET scan bed for just over a half-hour, but the scan itself only lasted for about 25 minutes. My scan went from about half-way down the head to my thighs. Since I am so tall (6’3″) my scan takes longer than people of a normal height. I actually kind of enjoyed the scan for the first half. The bed/table shape feels good on the back and a wedge is used to allow the knees to be bent. About halfway through the scan though my left knee locked up and was in pain for the rest of the day. This might be due to an old injury, or maybe due other factors. It is hard to say.

After the scan my wife and I went out to eat. My scan was in the afternoon and I had been fasting all day for the scan and I was hungry as heck. By the way, mid-afternoon is a great time to go out to eat if you are a chemo patient. We basically had the restaurant (Ruby Tuesdays) to ourselves. I didn’t wear a mask and it felt good to be going out.

The last time I had a scan we saw the results shortly afterwards during an appointment with the oncologist. That was when I first saw the fireworks. Now this time I have to wait almost a week for the results. My next scheduled appointment with the oncologist is next Tuesday during my fourth round of chemo. I didn’t think waiting for the results would impact me, but the waiting is definitely causing me some anxiety. This PET scan will show if the first three rounds of chemo are actually working. If the chemo isn’t working I’ll likely have to switch to another blend of chemo drugs. Chemo drugs are nasty and can have some horrendous side-effects. I know and can deal with the side-effects of my current chemo regiment, known as R-CHOP. The thought of chancing worse side-effects is actually causing me quite a bit of anxiety.

It of course didn’t help that both my wife and I saw a preview of the scan. From our untrained eyes the scan does not look any better than it did two months ago. Actually it appears there may be a new bright spot. Wondering if my cancer has spread or has changed from a grade 2 lymphoma into a grade 3 lymphoma is definitely causing me some stress.

Between now and Tuesday I am trying to keep my mind occupied in the hopes to keep my scanxiety down. So far it isn’t working very well and my anxiety seems to increase each day. Hopefully on Tuesday the Oncologist will let us know the chemo is working as planned and I can continue my R-CHOP regiment to push this lymphoma cancer into remission.

Return to the fireworks show

21079636Those following my blog may remember the first time I saw the PET scan result showing cancer spread throughout my body. I thought it looked like the final display for a fireworks show. After that scan things moved very fast and I started chemo the very next week. In this post I will recall the experience of meeting with the oncologist a week after chemo and being able to see the PET scan images again.

My original meeting with the oncologist occurred on Wednesday, September 5 (which seems like a lifetime ago now). In the first half of that meeting I got to know the oncologist. The second half of the meeting was where I saw the fireworks going throughout my whole body. I don’t remember much from that first meeting with the oncologist. Luckily I had a followup appointment scheduled with the oncologists one week after receiving my first round of chemo; which was about two weeks after my first meeting with the oncologist. This followup meeting with the oncologist was on Wednesday, September 19, for those keeping track.

The followup meeting with the oncologist is much clearer in my mind. In this meeting my wife and I were able to ask any questions about my condition. Honestly I really didn’t have too many questions. I tend to research things on my own and the few questions I had were more to confirm what I had already researched. Probably the biggest question she answered was how many cycles of chemo treatment I would have. My wife and I remembered her saying different numbers. The oncologist said I was scheduled for eight treatments; but that I would receive a PET scan again after three treatments and the results of that scan may show it only necessary to have six cycles of chemo treatments.

After answering our questions I asked the oncologist if she would show us the PET scan results again and let us know what we were seeing. I thought maybe looking at it with a clear mind it would look less like a fireworks show. I was wrong. Every bone shown signs of cancer. There were so many lymph nodes from my neck to groin infected that I gave up on trying to count them. A few of those lymph nodes were pushing into vertebrae, which explains some of the back problems I’ve had over the last year. One of my lungs was mostly taken over with cancer; although the other one was clear so that was good. My spleen was mostly infected with cancer. The spleen being full of cancer is not a surprise since it is part of the lymphatic system.

The kidneys and bladder were lit up. But the oncologist said this was due to the tracer drug used during the PET scan. Even so she paused when looking at one of the kidneys and I noticed later in my chart that it was recommended a kidney have an ultrasound done in the future just in case. So that is one more scan I will likely have soon.

Two weeks prior the oncologist had told me there was some good news, but I couldn’t remember what that was. She now let me know that news again. The glow of the cancer in the bones was consistent with the glow from the cancer in my lymph nodes. This likely meant the cancer which had spread was still low-grade and most likely had not transformed into a more aggressive form of cancer. She also let me know I would have an injection coming up to boost my bone marrow. Somehow I had forgotten that important bit of information from the first meeting with her.

I will have another PET scan after my third chemo treatment. Hopefully by that time my PET scan results will no longer look as extreme as this scan. Since my lymph nodes have shrunk and I can once again breath, I am assuming the chemo is doing something. I know my type of cancer can’t be cured, but I sure hope to see it being pushed back.

Meeting the oncologist part 2: The Fireworks!

34711852Two days ago I blogged about the first half of the initial meeting with my oncologist. Most of the first half of that meeting was about getting to know the oncologist and deciding whether my wife and I trusted this doctor to care for my cancer. Now I will focus on the second half of the meeting. Everything changed at that point due to the results of my PET scan.

The events of this post happened on Wednesday, September 5 (about two weeks ago as I write this). Earlier that afternoon I had a PET scan done. After the PET scan I met with my the doctor who would become my oncologist. About half way through the meeting with the oncologist my PET scan results were released. That was when the fireworks started.

As my doctor opened the PET scan results she explained we would be looking at “slices” of my body starting from neck and going all the way down to my thighs. She went on to explain there would be a glowing in the places where cancer was present. Almost immediately we were able to see about a handful of large glowing areas in my neck. I already knew there were lymph nodes with cancer in my neck because one of them was causing my windpipe to be restricted. What I didn’t expect to see was glowing everywhere as the doctor went along my body. I can’t actually remember much of that first scan, just feeling of being overwhelmed at seeing so many glowing spots. I also vaguely remember seeing my spleen and one of my lungs were infected with cancer. In my mind this looked like the finale at a large fireworks display. It appeared fireworks were going off everywhere!

I know the doctor took me through the whole scan an explained everything as we went. But I really don’t remember any of that. All I remember is her saying is that since my bones were infected that I would not need a bone marrow biopsy. She also talked about my symptoms and the fact that I would need to start chemo immediately. My lymphoma had spread to a point where a watch and wait approach would not longer be appropriate. Vaguely I also recall her saying there was some good news in what she saw so we would only have to do a chemo approach. I can’t remember exactly what that was she said though (in two weeks I met her again and know what she said now, but I will cover that in a future post).

After speaking with the doctor, my wife and I both agreed that we would proceed with chemo as soon as possible. The doctor put in an order to have a port placed in my chest to make chemo easier. This was on a Wednesday and she hoped the surgeon would be able to get the port in on Friday. She also hoped for me to start chemo the next Monday, although that was dependent upon me getting a port in before that time and upon the insurance company pre-approving chemo by that time.

Looking back I don’t remember feeling any particular emotion. I think I was just overwhelmed with finding out the cancer had spread throughout what appeared to be my whole body. There was probably a lot more said by the doctor during that meeting which I am simply forgetting. Luckily I had a meeting two weeks later with the doctor as she patiently went over everything with me again (again, that will be in a later post). Now that I think about it, I don’t even remember going home that day or if I finally got to each lunch after fasting for the PET scan. All I could see is the “fireworks” going off throughout my body.

This is where I’ll leave off for today. Even though I don’t remember much about the second half the initial meeting with oncologist, I will definitely never forget the fireworks discovered during said meeting. In the next post I will continue my story as I meet the surgeon and get a port placed in my chest.

Biopsy result and the PET scan

22299417Last post I blogged about my biopsy experience. In this post I will briefly blog about getting the biopsy results and about getting a PET scan. Also I will lightly touch on some anxiety I had leading up to the PET scan.

Thursday, August 23, is when I had the biopsy done. As I noted in the last post, the radiology doctor had let me know it would be three to five days until I got the biopsy results. I really didn’t do much that weekend as I waited for the results. My breathing had gotten worse so I basically just hung out with my family. I don’t recall being nervous about the biopsy results; it didn’t seem to matter at the time.

On Monday, August 27, I received a call from the doctor. He asked if I wanted to come in to get the biopsy results. I opted to receive the news over the phone. The doctor let me know I had a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma type called follicular lymphoma. He let me know the hospital would be in contact with me to set up a PET scan. My doctor asked me if I wanted to come in and talk about it. I didn’t do so. This probably should have been a big moment for me. It really wasn’t. I don’t remember feeling much of anything. At this point I had done enough research to know follicular lymphoma was not curable, but could be pushed into remission. I believe I was somewhat relieved it was a slow-growing type of cancer.

Later that day I got a call from the hospital to set up an appointment for the PET scan. The hospital I go to does not have a PET scan. Every Wednesday a truck comes from Sioux Falls to do scan. Since the PET scan was fully booked for that week, they asked if the following Wednesday would be ok. That mean waiting just over a week for a PET scan. I said that was OK and set up an appointment for the afternoon of Wednesday, September 5.

During that week many people asked me why I didn’t push to get the scan sooner. I really didn’t see a reason to. Yes, I did have options to get a PET scan sooner, but I really didn’t want to travel for a scan I could just wait a week to get locally. Also during that week my breathing continued to get worse. It was during this week that I experienced something I now know is called scanxiety. I won’t go into scanxiety at this time since I have it planned as a separate post in the future. All I will say is that as each day went on I wished I had gotten my PET scan sooner just to relieve the anxiety I was experiencing.

I did take one day “off” during my wait in order to take my little boys to the State Fair. I basically watched the free shows at the Freedom Stage while the boys played on the carnival rides. For a day I actually felt like I was able to do something for my kids and that helped to relieve my anxiety temporarily.

On the Monday before the PET scan I began the high protein diet required of me. Part of my scanxiety caused me to forget whether I was supposed to be on a high protein diet for 24 or 48 hours. That caused me to opt for doing 48 hours of high protein diet. Incidentally it was only asked to do so for 24 hours.

The other thing that caused my anxiety to raise was the fact my fall allergies decided to kick in that Monday. As part of this I was coughing even more than normal. I went on Claritin that Monday, which should mean it would be fully effective by scan time. But that didn’t stop me from worrying about coughing during the scan and possibly ruining any scan results.

Wednesday came and I was getting even more nervous about my scan. When I got a call from the PET scan technician asking if I wanted to come in an hour early I practically jumped for joy. Going early meant I could just get the damn scan over with.

Despite all the anxiety I had, the scan itself was very uneventful. The tech took my blood to ensure my glucose levels were low. I have a post coming up to explain why glucose levels are important for a PET scan. After the tech injected me with the tracer drug I just sat around visiting with the wife and with the tech for a while. He was a very interesting person (in a good way) and will also likely be the topic of a future post.

The PET scan itself went quicker than I thought it would. I laid down on a table similar to the one used for a CT scan. As time went on the table slowly moved me through a tube. Despite my anxiety leading up to the scan, I went the whole time without one cough. The scan tech had some good music on in the background and I focused on that music to get me through it. All-in-all I found the PET scan to be a non-event.

When the scan completed the tech let me know he would have the images prioritized by the staff in Sioux Falls. This was due to the fact I had an appointment with my oncologist later in the afternoon. Looking back I still think I let my “scanxiety” get way too bad for something that ended up being no big deal.

I’ll end this post here. In this post I mentioned getting my biopsy results, waiting for the PET Scan, and actually going through with the PET scan. One common theme in this post was me going back and forth between seeing things as non-events and suffering anxiety. There really didn’t seem to be any middle ground. Next up in this series of blogs will be two posts about my visit with the oncologist.